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Economic Inequality in Spain: The European Union Household Panel Dataset

Author

Listed:
  • Santiago Budria

    (University of Madeira & CEEAplA)

  • Javier Díaz-Jiménez

    (University Carlos III)

Abstract

This article uses data from the 1998 European Union Household Panel to study economic inequality in Spain. It reports data on the Spanish distributions of income, labor income, and capital income, and on related features of inequality, such as age, employment status, educational attainment, and marital status. It also reports data on the income mobility of Spanish households. We find that income, earnings, and, very especially, capital income are very unequally in Spain.

Suggested Citation

  • Santiago Budria & Javier Díaz-Jiménez, 2005. "Economic Inequality in Spain: The European Union Household Panel Dataset," Labor and Demography 0505001, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpla:0505001
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 38
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Finn E. Kydland & Edward C. Prescott, 1990. "Business cycles: real facts and a monetary myth," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, vol. 14(Spr), pages 3-18.
    2. Franco Peracchi, 2002. "The European Community Household Panel: A review," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 63-90.
    3. Mariacristina De Nardi, 1999. "Wealth inequality, intergenerational links and estate taxation," Working Paper Series WP-99-13, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    4. Per Krusell & Anthony A. Smith & Jr., 1998. "Income and Wealth Heterogeneity in the Macroeconomy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(5), pages 867-896, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Corinne Mette, "undated". "Wellbeing and dependency among European elderly: The role of social integration," Working Papers 2005-12, FEDEA.
    2. Budría, Santiago & Pereira, Pedro T., 2008. "The Contribution of Vocational Training to Employment, Job-Related Skills and Productivity: Evidence from Madeira Island," IZA Discussion Papers 3462, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Namkee Ahn & Juan Ramón García & José A. Herce, "undated". "Demographic Uncertainty and Health Care Expenditure in Spain," Working Papers 2005-07, FEDEA.
    4. Javier Diaz-Gimenez & Julian Diaz-Saavedra, 2009. "Delaying Retirement in Spain," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 12(1), pages 147-167, January.
    5. Santiago Budria, 2010. "Schooling and the distribution of wages in the European private and public sectors," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(8), pages 1045-1054.
    6. Budria, Santiago, 2007. "Economic Inequality in Portugal: A Picture in the Beginnings of the 21st century," MPRA Paper 1784, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Inequality; Income distribution; Labour earnings distribution; Capital income distribution;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J - Labor and Demographic Economics

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