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Interdependent Preference Formation

Author

Listed:
  • Levent Kockesen

    (New York University)

  • Efe A. Ok

    (New York University)

  • Rajiv Sethi

    (Barnard College, Columbia University)

Abstract

A standard assumption in the economic approach to individual decision making is that people have independent preferences, that is, they care only about their absolute (material) payoffs. We study equilibria of the classic common pool resource extraction and public good games when some of the players have negatively interdependent preferences (in the sense that they care not only about their absolute payoffs but also about their relative payoffs) while the remainder have independent preferences. It is shown that at any equilibrium, those with interdependent preferences earn strictly higher absolute payoffs than do players with independent preferences. If the population composition evolves in accordance with any payoff monotonic evolutionary selection dynamics, then all players will have interdependent preferences in the long run. Similar (but weaker) results obtain for some other economically important classes of games in strategic form. The robustness of our findings with respect to other preference formation mechanisms such as myopic and rational socialization is also discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Levent Kockesen & Efe A. Ok & Rajiv Sethi, 1997. "Interdependent Preference Formation," Game Theory and Information 9708002, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpga:9708002
    Note: Type of Document - Acrobat PDF; prepared on IBM PC ; to print on HP; pages: 35 ; figures: included
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Friedman, Daniel & Singh, Nirvikar, 2004. "Vengefulness Evolves in Small Groups," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt0xp29105, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
    2. Levent Kockesen & Efe A. Ok & Rajiv Sethi, 1997. "On the Strategic Advantage of Negatively Interdependent Preferences," Game Theory and Information 9708001, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 08 Aug 1997.
    3. Gary E Bolton & Axel Ockenfels, 1997. "A Theory of Equity, Reciprocity, and Competition," Levine's Working Paper Archive 1889, David K. Levine.
    4. Gary Bolton & Jordi Brandts & Axel Ockenfels, 1998. "Measuring Motivations for the Reciprocal Responses Observed in a Simple Dilemma Game," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 1(3), pages 207-219, December.
    5. Gary Bolton, 1998. "Bargaining and Dilemma Games: From Laboratory Data Towards Theoretical Synthesis," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 1(3), pages 257-281, December.
    6. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:3:y:2007:i:59:p:1-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Akiko Maruyama, 2007. "On the coexistence of reciprocity and materialism," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 3(59), pages 1-9.
    8. Mitra, Tapan & Ok, Efe A. & Kockesen, Levent, 1998. "Popular support for progressive taxation and the relative income hypothesis," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 69-76, January.
    9. Bisin, Alberto & Verdier, Thierry, 1998. "On the cultural transmission of preferences for social status," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 75-97, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Interdependent Preferences; Evolution; Socialization.;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities

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