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Is the Proportion of College Workers in “Non-College” Jobs Increasing?

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  • Peter T. Gottschalk
  • Michael Hansen

Abstract

This paper explores the claim that college-educated workers are increasingly likely to be in “non-college” occupations. We provide a conceptual framework that gives analytical content to the previously vague distinction between college and non-college jobs. This framework is used to show that skill-biased technological change will lead to a decline in the proportion of college workers in non-college jobs. This prediction is supported by the data.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter T. Gottschalk & Michael Hansen, 2001. "Is the Proportion of College Workers in “Non-College” Jobs Increasing?," JCPR Working Papers 223, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:wop:jopovw:223
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