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The determinants of regional disparities in skill segregation – Evidence from a cross section of German regions

  • Annekatrin Niebuhr

    ()

  • Javier Revilla Diez
  • Fabian Böttcher
  • Friso Schlitte

Increasing inequality in qualification specific employment prospects characterises labour markets in most highly developed countries. Theoretical models suggest that in-plant skill segregation might matter for the polarization of employment and wages. According to these models production technology and the educational level of the work force are important determinants of skill segregation. There are some studies that investigate the increasing in-plant skill segregation at the national level. However, since production technologies and skill structures are characterized by pronounced regional disparities, there are likely significant differences in the level of segregation between regions. But empirical evidence on corresponding regional inequalities is lacking. The objective of this analysis is to investigate regional disparities in skill segregation in Germany. Moreover, we analyse the determinants of these differences at the regional level. Our findings point to marked disparities among German regions. While rural areas are characterised by a weaker segregation, agglomeration areas have a higher level of skill segregation. Furthermore, skill segregation is increasing in most areas during the period under consideration, which may have regional economic consequences. The results of a regression analysis indicate that the local endowment with human capital is an important determinant for the regional level of skill segregation.

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Paper provided by European Regional Science Association in its series ERSA conference papers with number ersa10p640.

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Date of creation: Sep 2011
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Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa10p640
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  1. Acemoglu, D., 1996. "Changes in Unemployment and Wage Inequality: An Alternative Theory and Some Evidence," Working papers 96-15, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  2. Kremer, M & Maskin, E, 1996. "Wage Inequality and Segregation by Skill," Working papers 96-23, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  3. Griliches, Zvi, 1969. "Capital-Skill Complementarity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 51(4), pages 465-68, November.
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  5. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser & Jacob L. Vigdor, 1997. "The Rise and Decline of the American Ghetto," NBER Working Papers 5881, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Daron Acemoglu, 1998. "Why Do New Technologies Complement Skills? Directed Technical Change And Wage Inequality," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 113(4), pages 1055-1089, November.
  7. Lindbeck, Assar & Snower, Dennis J., 1996. "Reorganization of Firms and Labour Market Inequality," CEPR Discussion Papers 1375, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. David Autor, 2000. "Wiring the Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 7959, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Gilles Duranton, 1998. "The Economics of Productive Systems: Segmentation and Skill-Biased Change," CEP Discussion Papers dp0398, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  10. David H. Autor & Frank Levy & Richard J. Murnane, 2003. "The Skill Content Of Recent Technological Change: An Empirical Exploration," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 118(4), pages 1279-1333, November.
  11. Daron Acemoglu, 2001. "Directed Technical Change," NBER Working Papers 8287, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Daniel Hoechle, 2007. "Robust standard errors for panel regressions with cross-sectional dependence," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 7(3), pages 281-312, September.
  13. Dohse, Dirk & Laaser, Claus-Friedrich & Schrader, Jörg-Volker & Soltwedel, Rüdiger, 2005. "Raumstruktur im Internetzeitalter: Tod der Distanz? Eine empirische Analyse," Kiel Discussion Papers 416/417, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  14. John C. Driscoll & Aart C. Kraay, 1998. "Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimation With Spatially Dependent Panel Data," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(4), pages 549-560, November.
  15. Nickell, Stephen & Bell, Brian, 1995. "The Collapse in Demand for the Unskilled and Unemployment across the OECD," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(1), pages 40-62, Spring.
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