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Elite Universities, Program Capacities and the Student Admission Decision

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  • Philippe Cyrenne

Abstract

A long standing matter of debate is the admission criteria used by elite universities and colleges for incoming students. This paper develops a relatively simple framework which allows for an analysis of a number of factors that might play a role in admissions. I find that a key choice variable for universities is their choice of program capacities, which has both a direct and indirect effect on an institution’s reputation. For some elite institutions, choosing to forego certain programs provides commitment value which enables it to avoid some of the enrollment controversies which have emerged in recent years.

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  • Philippe Cyrenne, 2020. "Elite Universities, Program Capacities and the Student Admission Decision," Departmental Working Papers 2020-02, The University of Winnipeg, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:win:winwop:2020-02
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    File URL: http://economics.uwinnipeg.ca/RePEc/winwop/2020-02.pdf
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