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Affirmative Action in College Admission Decisions and the Distribution of Human Capital

  • David Welsch

    ()

    (Department of Economics, University of Wisconsin - Whitewater)

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    This paper presents a model consisting of a large number of students who differ by race and by the stock of human capital of their parents. Students choose effort levels in high school and college. College attendance is dependent on the student’s decision to attend college and the college’s decision to accept the student. Colleges in this paper enact admission policies that are not colorblind. The computational experiments reveal that under affirmative action, some minority students who were already attending college without affirmative action acquire less human capital because affirmative action reduces their incentive to exert effort in high school.

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    File URL: http://www.uww.edu/documents/colleges/cobe/economics/wpapers/12-02_Welsch.pdf
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    Paper provided by UW-Whitewater, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 12-02.

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    Length: 37 pages
    Date of creation: Sep 2012
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:uww:wpaper:12-02
    Contact details of provider: Postal: Whitewater, WI 53190-1750
    Phone: (414) 472-1361
    Web page: http://www.uww.edu/cobe/economics/main.html

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    1. M. Kathleen Thomas, 2004. "Where College-Bound Students Send Their SAT Scores: Does Race Matter?-super-," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1374-1389.
    2. Harry Holzer & David Neumark, 1999. "Assessing Affirmative Action," NBER Working Papers 7323, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Jimmy Chan & Erik Eyster, 2003. "Does Banning Affirmative Action Lower College Student Quality?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(3), pages 858-872, June.
    4. Su, Xuejuan, 2004. "The allocation of public funds in a hierarchical educational system," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 28(12), pages 2485-2510, December.
    5. Long, M.C.Mark C., 2004. "College applications and the effect of affirmative action," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 121(1-2), pages 319-342.
    6. Rothschild, Michael & White, Lawrence J, 1995. "The Analytics of the Pricing of Higher Education and Other Services in Which the Customers Are Inputs," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(3), pages 573-86, June.
    7. Dickson, Lisa M., 2006. "Does ending affirmative action in college admissions lower the percent of minority students applying to college?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 109-119, February.
    8. Peter Arcidiacono, 2005. "Affirmative Action in Higher Education: How Do Admission and Financial Aid Rules Affect Future Earnings?," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 73(5), pages 1477-1524, 09.
    9. Driskill, Robert A & Horowitz, Andrew W, 2002. "Investment in Hierarchical Human Capital," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 6(1), pages 48-58, February.
    10. Qiang Fu, 2006. "A Theory of Affirmative Action in College Admissions," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 44(3), pages 420-428, July.
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