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Emerging market fluctuations : what makes the difference ?

  • Hevia, Constantino

Aggregate fluctuations in emerging countries are quantitatively larger and qualitatively different in key respects from those in developed countries. Using data from Mexico and Canada, this paper decomposes these differences in terms of shocks to aggregate efficiency and shocks that distort the decisions of households about how much to invest, consume, and work in a standard model of a small open economy. The decomposition exercise suggests that most of these differences are explained by fluctuations in aggregate efficiency, distortions in labor decisions over the business cycle, and, most importantly, fluctuations in country risk. Other distortions are quantitatively less important.

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Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 4897.

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Date of creation: 01 Apr 2009
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4897
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