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First People Lost: Determining the State of Status First Nations Mortality in Canada Using Administrative Data

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Abstract

We present the most comprehensive set of estimates to date for Status First Nations mortality in Canada. We use administrative data from Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada to establish a set of stylized facts regarding Status First Nations mortality rates from 1974 to 2013. Between 2010 to 2013, the mortality rates of Status First Nations men and boys are highest in nearly all age groups considered with the exception of Status girls between the ages of 10 to 14. On reserve, Status boys between the ages of 15 to 19 have mortality rates nearly four times that in the general population, while Status girls between the ages of 15 to 19 have mortality rates five times that in the general population. We demonstrate substantial regional variation in mortality rates which are correlated with economic factors. We document that there has been no improvement in mortality among Status women and girls living on-reserve in the last 30 years and relative mortality rates for all Status people on-reserve has not changed in 40 years. Mortality rates may be worsening among some age groups. JEL Classification: J15,J16,I15,I14

Suggested Citation

  • Donna Feir & Randall Akee, 2018. "First People Lost: Determining the State of Status First Nations Mortality in Canada Using Administrative Data," Department Discussion Papers 1802, Department of Economics, University of Victoria.
  • Handle: RePEc:vic:vicddp:1802
    Note: ISSN 1914-2838
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Donna Feir & Robert L.A. Hancock, 2016. "Answering the Call: A Guide to Reconciliation for Quantitative Social Scientists," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 42(3), pages 350-365, September.
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    4. Monica Das Gupta, 2006. "Cultural versus Biological Factors in Explaining Asia's “Missing Women”: Response to Oster," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 32(2), pages 328-332, June.
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    7. Donna Feir, 2013. "Size, Structure, and Change: Exploring the Sources of Aboriginal Earnings Gaps in 1995 and 2005," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 39(2), pages 309-334, June.
    8. Esther Duflo, 2012. "Women Empowerment and Economic Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(4), pages 1051-1079, December.
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    15. Akee, Randall K. Q. & Feir, Donna, 2016. "Excess Mortality, Institutionalization and Homelessness Among Status Indians in Canada," IZA Discussion Papers 10416, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
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    Keywords

    Mortality; First Nations; Native American; Status First Nation; gender bias;

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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