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Excess Mortality, Institutionalization and Homelessness Among Status Indians in Canada

Author

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  • Akee, Randall K. Q.

    () (University of California, Los Angeles)

  • Feir, Donna

    () (University of Victoria)

Abstract

In this paper we use confidential-use Census and administrative data to produce the first national estimates of excess mortality, institutionalization and homelessness for the largest Indigenous population in Canada from the ages of 5 to 64. We identify mortality rates at least twice the Canadian average and find exceptionally high mortality rates for young Indigenous women and girls – up to four times the Canadian average at certain ages. We show mortality rates are even higher on reserve – up to five times the Canadian average. These relative mortality rates are higher than the relative mortality rates of African Americans and the Native Americans to non-Hispanics in the United States. We also estimate very high rates of institutionalization and homelessness, especially among men and as a result there are stark gender ratio imbalances among this population. We speculate that this gender imbalance may play a role in excess female mortality in addition to several other socioeconomic factors.

Suggested Citation

  • Akee, Randall K. Q. & Feir, Donna, 2016. "Excess Mortality, Institutionalization and Homelessness Among Status Indians in Canada," IZA Discussion Papers 10416, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10416
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Donna Feir & Randall Akee, 2018. "Estimating Institutionalization and Homelessness for Status First Nations in Canada: A Method and Implications," Department Discussion Papers 1801, Department of Economics, University of Victoria.
    2. Donna Feir & M. Chris Auld, 2017. "The Effect of Indian Residential Schools on Height and Body Mass Post-1930," Department Discussion Papers 1703, Department of Economics, University of Victoria.
    3. Donna Feir & Randall Akee, 2018. "First People Lost: Determining the State of Status First Nations Mortality in Canada Using Administrative Data," Department Discussion Papers 1802, Department of Economics, University of Victoria.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    mortality; First Nations; Native American; Status Indian; homelessness; institutionalization; gender bias;

    JEL classification:

    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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