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Cultural versus Biological Factors in Explaining Asia's "Missing Women": Response to Oster


  • Monica Das Gupta


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  • Monica Das Gupta, 2006. "Cultural versus Biological Factors in Explaining Asia's "Missing Women": Response to Oster," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 32(2), pages 328-332.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:popdev:v:32:y:2006:i:2:p:328-332

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Dreze, Jean & Sen, Amartya, 2002. "India: Development and Participation," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, edition 2, number 9780199257492, June.
    2. Prabir C. Bhattacharya, 2004. "Economic Development, Gender Inequality and Demographic Outcomes: Evidence from India," Working Papers E01, Department of Economics, School of Management and Languages, Heriot Watt University.
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    Cited by:

    1. Francisco J. Beltrán Tapia & Domingo Gallego, 2015. "Where are the missing girls? Gender discrimination in mid-19th century Spain," Working Papers 23, Department of Economic and Social History at the University of Cambridge.
    2. Akee, Randall K. Q. & Feir, Donna, 2016. "Excess Mortality, Institutionalization and Homelessness Among Status Indians in Canada," IZA Discussion Papers 10416, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Vani S. Kulkarni & Manoj Pandey & Raghav Gaiha, 2013. "MDGs and gender inequality," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 18813, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
    4. Stephan Klasen, 2008. "Missing Women: Some Recent Controversies on Levels and Trends in Gender Bias in Mortality," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 168, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.
    5. Husain, Zakir & Dutta, Mousumi & Saha, Manashi, 2011. "Gender disparities in primary education across siblings: is intra household disparity higher in regions with low child sex ratios?," MPRA Paper 30791, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. World Bank, 2011. "Work and Family : Latin American and Caribbean Women in Search of a New Balance
      [Trabajo & familia : mujeres de América Latina y el Caribe en busca de un nuevo equilibrio - Resumen ejecuivo (Vol. 2
      ," World Bank Other Operational Studies 12489, The World Bank.
    7. Seo-Young Cho, 2011. "Integrating Equality - Globalization, Women’s Rights, Son Preference and Human Trafficking," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 73, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    8. Stephan Klasen & Sebastian Vollmer, 2016. "A Flow Measure of Missing Women by Age and Disease," PGDA Working Papers 11314, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.

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