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Pluralist economics curricula: do they work; and how would we know?

Author

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  • Andrew Mearman

    () (University of the West of England, Bristol)

Abstract

This paper aims to illuminate the debate on pluralist economics curricula by examining ways in which such curricula are evaluated. The paper argues for pluralism as a general approach and as pedagogy. It argues that there is a plurality of pluralist curricula. It further argues that pluralist curricula have multiple goals, implying multiple criteria for their success. The paper then examines the potential for experimental methods to evaluate pluralist curricula. It is argued that for general and specific reasons, experimental methods are unlikely to be illuminating. Rather, the paper argues for a mixed approach, entailing different types of data, different metrics of success, and a variety of data collection and analysis methods. It is claimed finally that the existing (albeit scant) evidence on pluralist curricula already employs many of the principles of pluralist evaluation.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew Mearman, 2012. "Pluralist economics curricula: do they work; and how would we know?," Working Papers 20121203, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwe:wpaper:20121203
    as

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    File URL: http://www2.uwe.ac.uk/faculties/BBS/BUS/Research/economics2012/1203.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Marianne Ferber, 1999. "Guidelines For Pre-College Economics Education: A Critique," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(3), pages 135-142.
    2. Andy Denis, 2013. "Pluralism in economics education," Chapters,in: Teaching Post Keynesian Economics, chapter 5, pages 88-105 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. June Lapidus, 2011. "But which theory is right? Economic pluralism, developmental epistemology and uncertainty," International Journal of Pluralism and Economics Education, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 2(1), pages 82-95.
    4. Paul Downward & Andrew Mearman, 2007. "Retroduction as mixed-methods triangulation in economic research: reorienting economics into social science," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 31(1), pages 77-99, January.
    5. Alan Freeman, 2009. "The Economists of Tomorrow: the Case for a Pluralist Subject Benchmark Statement for Economics," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 8(2), pages 23-40.
    6. Andrew Mearman & Aspasia Papa & Don Webber, 2014. "Why do Students Study Economics?," Economic Issues Journal Articles, Economic Issues, vol. 19(1), pages 119-147, March.
      • Andrew Mearman & Aspasia Papa & Don J. Webber, 2013. "Why do students study economics?," Working Papers 20131303, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    7. Richard McIntyre & Robert Van Horn, 2011. "Contending perspectives in one department," International Journal of Pluralism and Economics Education, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 2(1), pages 69-81.
    8. Cher Ping Lim, 1998. "The Effect of a Computer-Based Learning (CBL) Support Package on the Learning Outcome of Low-Performance Economics Students," Computers in Higher Education Economics Review, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 12(1), pages 19-26.
    9. Robert Garnett & Andrew Mearman, 2011. "Contending Perspectives, Twenty Years On: What Have Our Students Learned?," Working Papers 201104, Texas Christian University, Department of Economics.
    10. Siakantaris, Nikos, 2000. "Experimental Economics under the Microscope," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(3), pages 267-281, May.
    11. Peter Davies & Ross Guest, 2010. "What effect do we really have on students' understanding and attitudes? How do we know?," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 9(1), pages 6-9.
    12. Sheila Dow, 2009. "History of Thought and Methodology in Pluralist Economics Education," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 8(2), pages 41-57.
    13. Ruzita Mohd Amin & Mohamed Aslam Haneef, 2011. "The quest for better economics graduates: reviving the pluralist approach in the case of the International Islamic University, Malaysia," International Journal of Pluralism and Economics Education, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 2(1), pages 96-113.
    14. Feiner, Susan & Roberts, Bruce, 1995. "Using Alternative Paradigms to Teach about Race and Gender: A Critical Thinking Approach to Introductory Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 367-371, May.
    15. Stephen Resnick & Richard D. Wolff, 2011. "Teaching economics differently by comparing contesting theories," International Journal of Pluralism and Economics Education, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 2(1), pages 57-68.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    pluralism; economic education; mixed methods; evaluation; experimental methods;

    JEL classification:

    • A20 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - General
    • A22 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Undergraduate
    • B4 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology
    • B5 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches
    • C80 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - General
    • C9 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments

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