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Curriculum reform in UK economics: a critique

Author

Listed:
  • Andrew Mearman

    (University of the West of England, Bristol)

  • Sebastian Berger

    (University of the West of England, Bristol)

  • Danielle Guizzo

    (University of the West of England, Bristol)

Abstract

This paper offers a multi-dimensional critique of recent reforms to UK Economics curricular frameworks. The paper assesses the reforms in terms of their extent and the positions taken within them on their approach to economics, treatment of politics, and, crucially, educational philosophy. Despite claims of innovation and new epistemological caution in the wake of the global financial crisis, the reforms are found to be minor and superficial. The CORE programme and the revised Subject Benchmark Statement document for Economics still ignore educational philosophy; yet they are implicitly educationally instrumental and remain limitedly pluralist. Our conclusions are buttressed by contrasts made between UK reforms and the curriculum architecture found in the Brazilian system.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew Mearman & Sebastian Berger & Danielle Guizzo, 2016. "Curriculum reform in UK economics: a critique," Working Papers 20161611, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwe:wpaper:20161611
    as

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    File URL: http://www2.uwe.ac.uk/faculties/BBS/BUS/Research/General/Economics%20papers%202016/1611.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Damoc Adrian – Ioan, 2018. "Multidisciplinarity in economics education and how it can shape economic thinking in the future," Proceedings of the International Conference on Business Excellence, Sciendo, vol. 12(1), pages 263-275, May.
    2. Jorge Ivan Gonzalez & Mauricio Perez Salazar, 2019. "Mercados y Bienestar. Ensayos en memoria de homero cuevas," Books, Universidad Externado de Colombia, Facultad de Economía, number 79, September.
    3. Simon Niklas Hellmich, 2019. "Are People Trained in Economics “Different,†and if so, Why? A Literature Review," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 64(2), pages 246-268, October.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    curriculum reform; economics; pluralism; educational philosophy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics
    • A20 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - General
    • B50 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - General

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