IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/zbw/cessdp/52.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

"Why has economics turned out this way?": A socio-economic note on the explanation of monism in economics

Author

Listed:
  • Heise, Arne

Abstract

The economic science has - lamented by some, applauded by others - turned into a monistic discipline. In this short research note, a socio-economic answer to the question of why this happened is provided by combining an economic approach to the market for economic ideas with a sociological approach of a scientific (power) field.

Suggested Citation

  • Heise, Arne, 2016. ""Why has economics turned out this way?": A socio-economic note on the explanation of monism in economics," Discussion Papers 52, University of Hamburg, Centre for Economic and Sociological Studies (CESS/ZÖSS).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:cessdp:52
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/141824/1/860385183.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Randall G. Holcombe, 2008. "Pluralism versus Heterodoxy in Economics and the Social Sciences," The Journal of Philosophical Economics, Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies, The Journal of Philosophical Economics, vol. 1(2), pages 51-72, March.
    2. Robinson, Joan, 1972. "The Second Crisis of Economic Theory," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(2), pages 1-10, May.
    3. Coase, R H, 1974. "The Market for Goods and the Market for Ideas," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 64(2), pages 384-391, May.
    4. Charles L. Schultze, 1996. "The CEA: An Inside Voice for Mainstream Economics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(3), pages 23-39, Summer.
    5. Moore, Gregory, 2003. "John Neville Keynes's Solution to the English Methodenstreit," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(01), pages 5-38, March.
    6. Brian Loasby, 2003. "Closed models and open systems," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(3), pages 285-306.
    7. Max Albert, 2006. "Product Quality in Scientific Competition," Papers on Strategic Interaction 2006-06, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Strategic Interaction Group.
    8. Roger Middleton, 1998. "Charlatans or Saviours?," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 1556.
    9. Freeman, Alan & Kliman, Andrew, 2005. "Beyond talking the talk: towards a critical pluralist practice," MPRA Paper 48644, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 07 Nov 2006.
    10. Marvin Goodfriend, 2007. "How the World Achieved Consensus on Monetary Policy," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 21(4), pages 47-68, Fall.
    11. David Colander, 2005. "The Making of an Economist Redux," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 19(1), pages 175-198, Winter.
    12. Arthur, W Brian, 1989. "Competing Technologies, Increasing Returns, and Lock-In by Historical Events," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 99(394), pages 116-131, March.
    13. Coase, R H, 1974. "The Lighthouse in Economics," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(2), pages 357-376, October.
    14. Heise, Arne & Thieme, Sebastian, 2016. "The Short Rise and Long Fall of heterodox Economics in germany After the 1970s: Explorations in a Scientific Field of Power and Struggle," MPRA Paper 80022, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Frederic S. Lee, 2007. "The Research Assessment Exercise, the state and the dominance of mainstream economics in British universities," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 31(2), pages 309-325, March.
    16. Hodgson, Geoffrey M & Rothman, Harry, 1999. "The Editors and Authors of Economics Journals: A Case of Institutional Oligopoly?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(453), pages 165-186, February.
    17. Wolfram Elsner, 2012. "Microeconomics of Interactive Economies," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2233.
    18. Frederic S. Lee & Xuan Pham & Gyun Gu, 2013. "The UK Research Assessment Exercise and the narrowing of UK economics," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 37(4), pages 693-717.
    19. M. Fourcade & E. Ollion & Y. Algan., 2015. "The Superiority of Economists," VOPROSY ECONOMIKI, N.P. Redaktsiya zhurnala "Voprosy Economiki", vol. 7.
    20. Hacker, Jacob S., 2008. "The Great Risk Shift: The New Economic Insecurity and the Decline of the American Dream," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195335347.
    21. repec:mes:ijpoec:v:43:y:2014:i:3:p:70-93 is not listed on IDEAS
    22. Eggertsson, Thrainn, 1995. "On the Economics of Economics," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(2), pages 201-210.
    23. Marion Fourcade & Etienne Ollion & Yann Algan, 2015. "La superioridad de los economistas," Revista de Economía Institucional, Universidad Externado de Colombia - Facultad de Economía, vol. 17(33), pages 13-43, July-Dece.
    24. Jamie Morgan, 2015. "Is Economics Responding to Critique? What do the UK 2015 QAA Subject Benchmarks Indicate?," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(4), pages 518-538, October.
    25. Arne Heise, 2017. "Defining economic pluralism: ethical norm or scientific imperative," International Journal of Pluralism and Economics Education, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 8(1), pages 18-41.
    26. Richard B. Freeman, 1999. "It's Better Being an Economist (But Don't Tell Anyone)," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 139-145, Summer.
    27. Heise, Arne, 2016. "Walras' law in the context of pre-analytic visions: A note," Discussion Papers 54, University of Hamburg, Centre for Economic and Sociological Studies (CESS/ZÖSS).
    28. Arne Heise, 2014. "The Future of Economics in a Lakatos–Bourdieu Framework," International Journal of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(3), pages 70-93, July.
    29. J. E. King, 2002. "A History of Post Keynesian Economics since 1936," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2135.
    30. Robert Garnett, 2006. "Paradigms and pluralism in heterodox economics," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(4), pages 521-546.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Pluralism; Monism; Standardization; Regulation;

    JEL classification:

    • B59 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Other
    • D43 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Oligopoly and Other Forms of Market Imperfection
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • L15 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Information and Product Quality
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zbw:cessdp:52. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ZBW - German National Library of Economics). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/zohamde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.