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The Economists of Tomorrow: the Case for a Pluralist Subject Benchmark Statement for Economics

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  • Alan Freeman

    () (Association for Heterodox Economics)

Abstract

This paper, on behalf of the UK-based Association for Heterodox Economists (AHE), argues for a reformulation of the Subject Benchmark Statement for Economics (SBSE) on pluralist principles. Pluralism - the capacity to examine critically a range of explanations for observed reality - should be the primary required outcome of economics education. Specific provisions should recognise, promote, defend and guarantee this good practice in teaching and assessment alike. Such a revision, it argues, is the appropriate response to widespread criticism of economics, to which the monotheoretic character of its practice has laid the profession open, following the recession which began early in 2008.

Suggested Citation

  • Alan Freeman, 2009. "The Economists of Tomorrow: the Case for a Pluralist Subject Benchmark Statement for Economics," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 8(2), pages 23-40.
  • Handle: RePEc:che:ireepp:v:8:y:2009:i:2:p:23-40
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    File URL: http://www.economicsnetwork.ac.uk/iree/v8n2/freeman.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alan Freeman, 2010. "The Economists of Tomorrow," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 69(5), pages 1591-1613, November.
    2. Freeman, Alan, 1999. "The Emperor's Tailor: The Economists and the Crash of ‘98," MPRA Paper 6712, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    Cited by:

    1. Robert F. Garnett & Jack Reardon, 2011. "Pluralism in Economics Education," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 23 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Andy Denis, 2013. "Pluralism in economics education," Chapters,in: Teaching Post Keynesian Economics, chapter 5, pages 88-105 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Andrew Mearman & Sebastian Berger & Danielle Guizzo, 2016. "Curriculum reform in UK economics: a critique," Working Papers 20161611, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    4. Robert Garnett & Andrew Mearman, 2011. "Contending Perspectives, Twenty Years On: What Have Our Students Learned?," Working Papers 201104, Texas Christian University, Department of Economics.
    5. Gruszka, Katarzyna & Scharbert, Annika Regine & Soder, Michael, 2016. "Changing the world one student at a time? Uncovering subjective understandings of economics instructors' roles," Ecological Economic Papers 4794, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    6. Andrew Mearman, 2012. "Pluralist economics curricula: do they work; and how would we know?," Working Papers 20121203, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    7. Justus Haucap & Tobias Thomas & Gert G. Wagner, 2015. "Zu wenig Einfluss des ökonomischen Sachverstands? Empirische Befunde zum Einfluss von Ökonomen und anderen Wissenschaftlern auf die Wirtschaftspolitik," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1449, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    8. Kirchgässner, Gebhard, 2014. "On the Process of Scientific Policy Advice - With Special Reference to Economic Policy," Economics Working Paper Series 1438, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
    9. Gruszka, Katarzyna & Scharbert, Annika Regine & Soder, Michael, 2017. "Leaving the mainstream behind? Uncovering subjective understandings of economics instructors' roles," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 485-498.
    10. repec:eme:rpeczz:s0161-7230(2011)0000027013 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Robert Garnett & John Reardon, 2011. "Big Think: A Model for Critical Inquiry in Economics Courses," Working Papers 201102, Texas Christian University, Department of Economics.
    12. Andrew Mearman, 2010. "What is this thing called ‘heterodox economics’?," Working Papers 1006, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    13. Katarzyna Gruszka & Annika Scharbert & Michael Soder, 2016. "Changing the world one student at a time? Uncovering subjective understandings of economics instructors' roles," Ecological Economics Papers ieep7, Institute of Ecological Economics.
    14. Alan Freeman, 2011. "Crisis, Marxism, and Economic Laws: A Response to Gary Mongiovi," Research in Political Economy,in: Revitalizing Marxist Theory for Today's Capitalism, volume 27, pages 285-296 Emerald Publishing Ltd.

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