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Economics: Continuities, Changes, Challenges

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  • Dieter Bögenhold

Abstract

The term "heterodox economics" has been in existence for several decades. Recent revival of heterodox economics can be regarded as a growing criticism of economists within the own profession of economics. Modern economics is designed as a one-world-capitalism without history and without regional specifications, without institutions, and without real human agents. Heterodox approaches have the aim to underline that different institutions matter, including religion, language, family structures and networks, systems of education, and industrial relations. Taking the discussion within a broader framework of the history of science acknowleges divergencies and convergencies between different approaches in economics that are also in permanent recomposition. The discussion comes up with the interpretation that recent academic developments provide chances for new modes of intellectual reintegration of formerly disparate areas. Copyright © 2010 American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Inc..

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  • Dieter Bögenhold, 2010. "Economics: Continuities, Changes, Challenges," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 69(5), pages 1566-1590, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ajecsc:v:69:y:2010:i:5:p:1566-1590
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    Cited by:

    1. Cedrini, Mario & Fontana, Magda, 2015. "Mainstreaming. Reflections on the Origins and Fate of Mainstream Pluralism," CESMEP Working Papers 201501, University of Turin.

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