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Statistical Properties of a Heterogeneous Asset Price Model with Time-Varying Second Moment

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Abstract

Stability and bifurcation analysis of deterministic systems has been widely used in modeling financial markets. However, the impact of such dynamic phenomena on various statistical properties of the corresponding stochastic model, including skewness and excess kurtosis, various autocorrelation (AC) patterns of under and over reactions, and volatility clustering characterised by the long-range dependence of ACs, is not clear and has been very little studied. This paper aims to study this issue. Through a simple behavioural asset pricing model with fundamentalists and chartists, we examine the statistical properties of the model and their connection to the dynamics of the underlying deterministic model. In particular, our analysis leads to some insights into the type of mechanism that may be generating some of the stylised facts, such as fat tails, skewness, high kurtosis and long memory, observed in high frequency financial data.

Suggested Citation

  • Carl Chiarella & Xue-Zhong He & Duo Wang, 2004. "Statistical Properties of a Heterogeneous Asset Price Model with Time-Varying Second Moment," Research Paper Series 142, Quantitative Finance Research Centre, University of Technology, Sydney.
  • Handle: RePEc:uts:rpaper:142
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    File URL: http://www.qfrc.uts.edu.au/research/research_papers/rp142.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Park, Beum-Jo, 2014. "Time-varying, heterogeneous risk aversion and dynamics of asset prices among boundedly rational agents," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 150-159.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    fundamentalists; chartists; stability; bifurcation; investors' under- and over-reactions; stylized facts;

    JEL classification:

    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • D84 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Expectations; Speculations
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • C60 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - General

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