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Determinants of Income Inequality and its Effects on Economic Growth: Evidence from African Countries

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  • Matthew Odedokun
  • Jeffery I. Round

Abstract

The paper empirically investigates, in the context of African countries, the determinants of income distribution and inequality, the effect of inequality on economic growth, and the channels through which inequality affects growth. Data for 35 countries over different periods in the last four decades were employed.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthew Odedokun & Jeffery I. Round, 2001. "Determinants of Income Inequality and its Effects on Economic Growth: Evidence from African Countries," WIDER Working Paper Series DP2001-103, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:dp2001-103
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    File URL: https://www.wider.unu.edu/sites/default/files/dp2001-103.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

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    2. Marinko Škare & Saša Stjepanovic, 2014. "Income Distribution Determinants and Inequality – International Comparison," The AMFITEATRU ECONOMIC journal, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 16(37), pages 980-980, August.
    3. Luisa Blanco & Robin Grier, 2009. "Long Live Democracy: The Determinants of Political Instability in Latin America," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(1), pages 76-95.
    4. Vanesa Jorda & Jose M. Alonso, 2020. "What works to mitigate and reduce relative (and absolute) inequality?: A systematic review," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2020-152, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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