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The Kuznets inverted-U hypothesis: panel data evidence from 96 countries


  • John Thornton


Regression results from a panel data set of high-quality comparable data on Gini coefficients, income quintiles and real GDP per capita in 96 countries over the postwar period, suggest that the relation between income inequality and development corresponds to an inverted-U, as hypothesized by Kuznets.

Suggested Citation

  • John Thornton, 2001. "The Kuznets inverted-U hypothesis: panel data evidence from 96 countries," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(1), pages 15-16.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:8:y:2001:i:1:p:15-16 DOI: 10.1080/135048501750041213

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Galor, Oded & Tsiddon, Daniel, 1996. "Income Distribution and Growth: The Kuznets Hypothesis Revisited," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 63(250), pages 103-117, Suppl..
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    Cited by:

    1. Sousa, Alexandre Gervasio & Araujo, Aracy Alves & Santos, Ricardo Bruno Nascimento dos & Santos, Francivane Teles Pampolha Dos & Diniz, Marvelo Bentes, 2008. "Sustentabilidade e meio ambiente no Brasil: uma análise a partir da curva de Kuznets," 46th Congress, July 20-23, 2008, Rio Branco, Acre, Brasil 103103, Sociedade Brasileira de Economia, Administracao e Sociologia Rural (SOBER).
    2. Michael A. Clemens, 2014. "Does development reduce migration?," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Migration and Economic Development, chapter 6, pages 152-185 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Costanza Naguib, 2015. "The Relationship between Inequality and GDP Growth: an Empirical Approach," LIS Working papers 631, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    4. Mehmet Mercan & Ozlem Azer, 2013. "The Relationship between Economic Growth and Income Distribution in Turkey and the Turkish Republics of Central Asia and Caucasia: Dynamic Panel Data Analysis with Structural Breaks," Eurasian Economic Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 3(2), pages 165-182, December.
    5. Natalia Vashchelyuk, 2015. "The Impact of Output Dynamics on Income Inequality in the Russian Regions," Economy of region, Centre for Economic Security, Institute of Economics of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, vol. 1(4), pages 132-144.
    6. Wan, Guanghua, 2002. "Income Inequality and Growth in Transition Economies: Are Nonlinear Models Needed?," WIDER Working Paper Series 104, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Jaya Krishnakumar & Cristian Ugarte, 2011. "The effect of growth on poverty reduction," Research Papers by the Institute of Economics and Econometrics, Geneva School of Economics and Management, University of Geneva 11061, Institut d'Economie et Econométrie, Université de Genève.
    8. Jalil, Mohammad Muaz, 2009. "Re-examining Kuznets Hypothesis: Does Data Matter?," MPRA Paper 72557, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Alvargonzalez, M. & Lopez, A. & Perez, R., 2004. "Growth-Inequality Relationship. An Analytical Approach and Some Evidence for Latin America," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 4(2).
    10. Michael Clemens, 2014. "Does Development Reduce Migration? - Working Paper 359," Working Papers 359, Center for Global Development.
    11. Odedokun, Matthew & Round, Jeffery I., 2001. "Determinants of Income Inequality and its Effects on Economic Growth: Evidence from African Countries," WIDER Working Paper Series 103, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    12. repec:eee:eneeco:v:65:y:2017:i:c:p:98-104 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Perera, Liyanage Devangi H. & Lee, Grace H.Y., 2013. "Have economic growth and institutional quality contributed to poverty and inequality reduction in Asia?," MPRA Paper 52763, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Atici, Cemal, 2012. "Carbon emissions, trade liberalization, and the Japan–ASEAN interaction: A group-wise examination," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 167-178.
    15. David Kiefer & Shahrukh Rafi Khan, 2003. "Revealed (or Imposed) Social Preferences for Equality and Growth," Working Paper Series, Department of Economics, University of Utah 2003_01, University of Utah, Department of Economics.

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