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Impact of external knowledge acquisition strategies on innovation: a comparative study based on Dutch and Swiss panel data

Listed author(s):
  • Arvanitis, S.

    (External organisation)

  • Lokshin, B.

    ()

    (Organisation and Strategy)

  • Mohnen, P.

    ()

    (Quantitative Economics)

  • Wörter, M.

    (External organisation)

In this paper we empirically investigate the impact of two external knowledge acquisition strategies—‘buy’ and ‘cooperate’—on firm’s innovation performance. Taking a direct (productivity) approach, we test for complementarity effects in the simultaneous use of the two strategies, and in the intensity of their use. Our results—based on panels of Dutch and Swiss innovating firms—suggest that while both ‘buy’ and ‘cooperate’ have a positive effect on innovation, there is little statistical evidence that using them simultaneously leads to higher innovation performance. Results from the Dutch sample provide some indication that there are positive economies of scope in doing external and cooperative R&D simultaneously. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

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Paper provided by United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT) in its series MERIT Working Papers with number 003.

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Date of creation: 01 Jan 2013
Handle: RePEc:unm:unumer:2013003
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