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Innovation Complementarity And Scale Of Production

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  • EUGENIO J. MIRAVETE
  • JOSÉ C. PERNÍAS

Abstract

We present an econometrically feasible model that uses the information contained in the innovation profile of each firm to test for the existence of complementarity among production and innovation strategies. Our approach is able to distinguish between complementarity and correlation induced by unobserved heterogeneity. We apply the model to analyze the Spanish ceramic tile industry where the adoption of the single firing furnace in the 1980's facilitated the introduction of new product designs as well as opening new ways of organizing production. Our econometric results show that there is significant complementarity between product and process innovation. Small firms tend to be more innovative overall.

Suggested Citation

  • Eugenio J. Miravete & José C. Pernías, 2006. "Innovation Complementarity And Scale Of Production," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(1), pages 1-29, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jindec:v:54:y:2006:i:1:p:1-29
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-6451.2006.00273.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Athey, Susan. & Stern, Scott, 1969-, 1998. "An empirical framework for testing theories about complementarity in orgaziational design," Working papers WP 4022-98., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management.
    2. Kaiser, Ulrich, 2003. "Strategic complementarities between different types of ICT-expenditures," ZEW Discussion Papers 03-46, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    3. Susan Athey & Scott Stern, 1998. "An Empirical Framework for Testing Theories About Complimentarity in Organizational Design," NBER Working Papers 6600, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C52 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Evaluation, Validation, and Selection
    • L20 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - General
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D

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