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Effectively involving low-SES parents in human capital development

Author

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  • Haelermans, Carla

    (RS: GSBE Theme Learning and Work, Macro, International & Labour Economics, RS: FSE TA-TIER)

  • Ghysels, Joris

    (RS: FSE TA-TIER)

Abstract

In this paper we analyze the effect of involving parents in human capital investment. We study the effect of a parental app on student effort in a digital homework practice tool, and its effect on subsequent human capital development. The randomized field experiment includes more than 2000 7-9 grade students of 2 schools and we specifically focus on different socio-economic status (SES) groups. The results indicate that parental involvement via an app positively affects effort and human capital development of 7th and 8th grade students, but not of 9th grade students. The positive effects are mainly driven by low-SES students and are larger for males.

Suggested Citation

  • Haelermans, Carla & Ghysels, Joris, 2019. "Effectively involving low-SES parents in human capital development," ROA Research Memorandum 008, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:umaror:2019008
    DOI: 10.26481/umaror.2019008
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James J. Heckman & Stefano Mosso, 2014. "The Economics of Human Development and Social Mobility," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 6(1), pages 689-733, August.
    2. Francesco Avvisati & Marc Gurgand & Nina Guyon & Eric Maurin, 2014. "Getting Parents Involved: A Field Experiment in Deprived Schools," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 81(1), pages 57-83.
    3. Petra E. Todd & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 2007. "The Production of Cognitive Achievement in Children: Home, School, and Racial Test Score Gaps," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 1(1), pages 91-136.
    4. Francesco Avvisati & Bruno Besbas & Nina Guyon, 2010. "Parental Involvement in School : A Literature Review," Revue d'économie politique, Dalloz, vol. 120(5), pages 759-778.
    5. Aizer, Anna, 2004. "Home alone: supervision after school and child behavior," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(9-10), pages 1835-1848, August.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments

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