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Behavioral Economics of Education

Author

Listed:
  • Lavecchia, A.M.
  • Liu, H.
  • Oreopoulos, P.

Abstract

Behavioral economics attempts to integrate insights from psychology, neuroscience, and sociology in order to better predict individual outcomes and develop more effective policy. While the field has been successfully applied to many areas, education has, so far, received less attention — a surprising oversight, given the field's key interest in long-run decision making and the propensity of youth to make poor long-run decisions. In this chapter, we review the emerging literature on the behavioral economics of education. We first develop a general framework for thinking about why youth and their parents might not always take full advantage of education opportunities. We then discuss how these behavioral barriers may be preventing some students from improving their long-run welfare. We evaluate the recent but rapidly growing efforts to develop policies that mitigate these barriers, many of which have been examined in experimental settings. Finally, we discuss future prospects for research in this emerging field.

Suggested Citation

  • Lavecchia, A.M. & Liu, H. & Oreopoulos, P., 2016. "Behavioral Economics of Education," Handbook of the Economics of Education,, Elsevier.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:educhp:v:5:y:2016:i:c:p:1-74
    DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-444-63459-7.00001-4
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Huebener, Mathias & Kuger, Susanne & Marcus, Jan, 2017. "Increased instruction hours and the widening gap in student performance," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 15-34.
    2. Joshua Goodman & Oded Gurantz & Jonathan Smith, 2020. "Take Two! SAT Retaking and College Enrollment Gaps," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 115-158, May.
    3. Arjan Non & Dirk Tempelaar, 2015. "Time Preferences, Study Effort, and Academic Performance," CESifo Working Paper Series 5533, CESifo.
    4. Non, Arjan & Tempelaar, Dirk, 2016. "Time preferences, study effort, and academic performance," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 36-61.

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