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Poverty reduction in China and India: Policy implications of recent trends?

  • Jayati Ghosh
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    This paper compares the experience of poverty reduction in China and India. It finds that more than economic growth per se, what has mattered crucially is the nature of the growth: whether it is associated with growing inequalities that do not allow the benefits of growth to reach the poor; whether the structural change involved in the growth process generates sufficient opportunities for productive non-agricultural employment; whether basic needs and essential social services are provided. Government mediation of these and of global economic integration is important in determining different outcomes.

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    File URL: http://www.un.org/esa/desa/papers/2010/wp92_2010.pdf
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    Paper provided by United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs in its series Working Papers with number 92.

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    Length: 28 pages
    Date of creation: Jan 2010
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:une:wpaper:92
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/working-papers.html
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    1. Dollar, David & Kraay, Aart, 2002. " Growth Is Good for the Poor," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 7(3), pages 195-225, September.
    2. Park, Albert & Wang, Sangui, 2001. "China's poverty statistics," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 384-398.
    3. Sylvie DEMURGER & SACHS & Wing Thye WOO & BAO & CHANG & MELLINGER, 2001. "Geography, Economic Policy and Regional Development in China," Working Papers 200109, CERDI.
    4. Gustafsson, Bjorn & Li, Shi, 2004. "Expenditures on education and health care and poverty in rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 292-301.
    5. Gaurav Datt & Martin Ravallion, 2002. "Is India's Economic Growth Leaving the Poor Behind?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(3), pages 89-108, Summer.
    6. Sanjay Reddy, 2008. "The World Bank's New Poverty Estimates: >i>Digging Deeper into a Hole>/i>," Challenge, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 51(6), pages 105-112, November.
    7. Fan, Shenggen & Zhang, Linxiu & Zhang, Xiaobo, 2002. "Growth, inequality, and poverty in rural China: the role of public investments," Research reports 125, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Ravi Kanbur & Xiaobo Zhang, 2004. "Fifty Years of Regional Inequality in China: A Journey Through Central Planning, Reform and Openness," Working Papers 158, Institute for Social and Economic Change, Bangalore.
    9. Shaohua Chen & Yan Wang, 2001. "China's growth and poverty reduction - trends between 1990 and 1999," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2651, The World Bank.
    10. Wing Thye Woo and Shuming Bao, 2003. "China: Case study on Human Development Progress towards the Millennium Developmental Goals at the Sub-National Level," Human Development Occasional Papers (1992-2007) HDOCPA-2003-14, Human Development Report Office (HDRO), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).
    11. (No last name available), Himanshu, 2013. "Poverty and Food Security in India," ADB Economics Working Paper Series 369, Asian Development Bank.
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