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Distributional biases in the analysis of climate change

  • Peter Skott


    (University of Massachusetts Amherst)

  • Leila Davis


    (University of Massachusetts Amherst)

The economic analysis of global warming is dominated by models based on optimal growth theory. These representative-agent models have an intrinsic distributional bias in favor of the rich. The bias is compounded by the se of revenue-neutrality in the allocation of emission permits. The result is mitigation recommendations that are biased downwards. JEL Categories: Q13, I3, E1

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Paper provided by University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics in its series UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers with number 2011-22.

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Date of creation: Oct 2011
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Handle: RePEc:ums:papers:2011-22
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