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Advancing methodological thinking and practice for development-compatible climate policy planning

Listed author(s):
  • S. Scrieciu

    ()

  • Valerie Belton

    ()

  • Zaid Chalabi

    ()

  • Reinhard Mechler

    ()

  • Daniel Puig

    ()

There are growing calls for identifying climate mitigation and adaptation policy packages that would also support human development objectives at the national and regional levels. The literature on climate policy analysis and impact assessment continues to be driven by standard economics with its body of competitive general equilibrium optimization models and cost-benefit analysis techniques of aggregation and monetization. However, its recommendations for climate action are often based on highly restrictive underlying assumptions, which have been increasingly criticized for being too prescriptive, not adequately capturing salient observed socioeconomic realities, and not acknowledging pluralism in values. The main aim of this paper is to put forward a new methodological approach that seeks to address these deficiencies. A generic but comprehensive framework eliciting mitigation-adaptation-development interactions, accounting for institutional barriers, and drawing on a combination of an emerging body of new climate economics and multi-criteria decision analysis is suggested. We purport that, by using this framework, multi-dimensional impacts and multi-stakeholder interests could be better represented when planning climate policy actions. We also argue that analytical tools drawing on economic thinking which embraces interdisciplinary analysis and deep uncertainty and avoids the fallacy of unique optimal solutions, may deliver more effective strategies for pushing economies onto the transformational pathways required. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11027-013-9538-z
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change.

Volume (Year): 19 (2014)
Issue (Month): 3 (March)
Pages: 261-288

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Handle: RePEc:spr:masfgc:v:19:y:2014:i:3:p:261-288
DOI: 10.1007/s11027-013-9538-z
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springer.com

Order Information: Web: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/11027

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