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Do In-State Tuition Benefits Affect the Enrollment of Non-Citizens? Evidence from Universities in Texas

Author

Listed:
  • Lisa M. Dickson

    () (UMBC)

  • Matea Pender

    () (Optimal Solutions Group)

Abstract

In 2001, the Texas state legislature passed House Bill 1403 and became the first state to offer in-state tuition rates at public universities for non-citizens who attended high school in the state for three years. As a result of the policy change, the cost of attending college at public universities in Texas fell dramatically for non-citizens. Using administrative data from six universities in Texas, we employ a quasi-experimental design to identify the effects of the policy change on the probability of enrollment. The results demonstrate a large and significant positive effect of lowering tuition on the enrollment of non-citizens at the University of Texas at Pan American and a positive and marginally significant effect on the probability of enrollment at the University of Texas at San Antonio. The results also suggest that the policy had a negative effect on enrollment at Southern Methodist University, a private university whose tuition was unchanged by the policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Lisa M. Dickson & Matea Pender, 2010. "Do In-State Tuition Benefits Affect the Enrollment of Non-Citizens? Evidence from Universities in Texas," UMBC Economics Department Working Papers 10-125, UMBC Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:umb:econwp:10125
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    File URL: http://www.umbc.edu/economics/wpapers/wp_10_125.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Conger, Dylan & Turner, Lesley J., 2017. "The effect of price shocks on undocumented students' college attainment and completion," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 148(C), pages 92-114.
    2. Robert Bozick & Trey Miller, 2014. "In-State College Tuition Policies for Undocumented Immigrants: Implications for High School Enrollment Among Non-citizen Mexican Youth," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 33(1), pages 13-30, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial aid; non-citizens; in-state tuition benefits.;

    JEL classification:

    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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