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Migration of Skilled Workers: Policy Interaction between Host and Source Countries


  • Slobodan Djajic
  • Michael S. Michael
  • Alexandra Vinogradova


This paper examines the interaction between policies of the host and source countries in the context of a model of skilled-worker migration. The host country aims to provide low-cost labor for its employers while also taking into consideration the fiscal burden of providing social services to migrant workers and their dependants. It optimizes by setting a time limit on the duration of a guest-worker's permit. The source country seeks to maximize its own welfare by optimally choosing the amount of training it offers to its citizens, some of whom may end up working abroad. Within this framework, we solve for the Nash equilibrium values of the policy instruments and compare them with the case where both countries cooperate to maximize joint welfare.

Suggested Citation

  • Slobodan Djajic & Michael S. Michael & Alexandra Vinogradova, 2012. "Migration of Skilled Workers: Policy Interaction between Host and Source Countries," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 12-2012, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucy:cypeua:12-2012

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Naiditch, Claire & Vranceanu, Radu, 2013. "A two-country model of high skill migration with public education," ESSEC Working Papers WP1301, ESSEC Research Center, ESSEC Business School.
    2. Fernández-Huertas Moraga, Jesús & Rapoport, Hillel, 2014. "Tradable immigration quotas," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 115(C), pages 94-108.
    3. repec:hal:journl:hal-00779716 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Slobodan Djajić, 2014. "Temporary Migration and the Flow of Savings to the Source Country," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(1), pages 162-176, February.
    5. Slobodan Djajić & Michael S. Michael, 2014. "International Migration of Skilled Workers with Endogenous Policies," IHEID Working Papers 09-2014, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.
    6. Irena Mikolajun & Jean-Marie Viaene, 2015. "Trade, Factor Mobility and the Extent of Economic Integration: Theory and Evidence," CESifo Working Paper Series 5481, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. Pierre Brochu & Till Gross & Christopher Worswick, 2016. "Temporary Foreign Workers and Firms: Theory and Canadian Evidence," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1628, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    8. Irena Mikolajun & Jean-Marie Viaene, 2015. "Trade, Factor Mobility and the Extent of Economic Integration: Theory and Evidence," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 15-096/VI, Tinbergen Institute.
    9. Biavaschi, Costanza & Elsner, Benjamin, 2013. "Let's Be Selective about Migrant Self-Selection," IZA Discussion Papers 7865, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item


    Temporary Migration; Skilled Labor; Immigration Policy;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration

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