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International Movements of the Highly Skilled

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  • John Salt

Abstract

In recent years there has been a growing recognition of the importance of international recruitment and movement of the highly skilled. Modern industries and services increasingly rely upon the acquisition, deployment and use of human expertise to add value in their operations. When this expertise is not available locally, employers frequently import it from abroad. This takes place in the context of two fundamental and interrelated processes: the development of internal labour markets by employers, on the one hand, and of the institutional framework by governments to facilitate the global interchange of skills, on the other. The principal flows of highly skilled workers today reflect the global expansion of world trade, the international expansion of trans-national corporations, and the activities of institutions such as governments and recruitment agencies. Although not straightforward, there appears for example to be a positive relationship between flows of skilled labour and ...

Suggested Citation

  • John Salt, 1997. "International Movements of the Highly Skilled," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 3, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:elsaab:3-en
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/104411065061
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    Cited by:

    1. Jansson, Olle, 2017. "Organized interests and foreign-educated professionals: The case of the associations for physicians and nurses in Sweden," Working Paper Series 2017:18, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    2. Baruffaldi, Stefano H. & Di Maio, Giorgio & Landoni, Paolo, 2017. "Determinants of PhD holders’ use of social networking sites: An analysis based on LinkedIn," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 740-750.
    3. Irina BONCEA, 2015. "Romania’S Medical Sector: Between Brain Drain And Brain Waste," SEA - Practical Application of Science, Fundația Română pentru Inteligența Afacerii, Editorial Department, issue 7, pages 109-112, April.
    4. Commander, Simon & Kangasniemi, Mari & Winters, L. Alan, 2003. "The Brain Drain: Curse or Boon?," IZA Discussion Papers 809, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Joël Oudinet & Franck Bailly & El Mouhoub Mouhoud, 2004. "Les pays de l'Union européenne face aux nouvelles dynamiques des migrations internationales," Post-Print halshs-00487079, HAL.
    6. Djajić, Slobodan & Michael, Michael S. & Vinogradova, Alexandra, 2012. "Migration of skilled workers: Policy interaction between host and source countries," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 1015-1024.
    7. Baruffaldi, Stefano H. & Landoni, Paolo, 2012. "Return mobility and scientific productivity of researchers working abroad: The role of home country linkages," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(9), pages 1655-1665.
    8. Weel, Bas ter, 1999. "Investing in Knowledge: On the Trade-Off between R&D, ICT, Skills and Migration," Research Memorandum 024, Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    9. repec:dau:papers:123456789/1808 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Davenport, Sally, 2004. "Panic and panacea: brain drain and science and technology human capital policy," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 617-630, May.
    11. Doan, Thi Hong Thinh & Gente, Karine, 2014. "Real exchange rate and productivity in a specific-factor model with skilled and unskilled labour," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 1-15.
    12. repec:spr:anresc:v:59:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s00168-016-0762-9 is not listed on IDEAS

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