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Education, Economic Growth, and Brain Drain

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  • Kar-yiu Wong
  • Chong K. Yip

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  • Kar-yiu Wong & Chong K. Yip, 1998. "Education, Economic Growth, and Brain Drain," Discussion Papers in Economics at the University of Washington 0078, Department of Economics at the University of Washington.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:washer:0078
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    File URL: http://faculty.washington.edu/karyiu/papers/Gro&BraDra.htm
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kar-yiu Wong, 1986. "The Economic Analysis of International Migration: A Generalization," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 19(2), pages 357-362, May.
    2. Blomqvist, Ake G, 1986. "International Migration of Educated Manpower and Social Rates of Return to Education in LDCs," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 27(1), pages 165-174, February.
    3. Berry, R Albert & Soligo, Ronald, 1969. "Some Welfare Aspects of International Migration," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 77(5), pages 778-794, Sept./Oct.
    4. Shea, K. -L. & Woodfield, A. E., 1996. "Optimal immigration, education and growth in the long run," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(3-4), pages 495-506, May.
    5. Wong, K.Y., 1996. "Endogenous Growth and International Labor Migration: The Case of a Small, Emigration Economy," Discussion Papers in Economics at the University of Washington 96-08, Department of Economics at the University of Washington.
    6. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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