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Lying, Integrity, and Cooperation

  • Lanse P. Minkler

    (University of Connecticut)

  • Thomas J. Miceli

    (University of Connecticut)

While talk is cheap to some, it is expensive to others for whom moral considerations come into play. We employ a simple two-stage modified prisoner's dilemma game where integrity is endowed on a continuum to analyze when agents will lie in random economic interactions. If there is sufficient integrity in the population, all agents make a promise in the first stage to cooperate in the second. Some agents always lie, some always tell the truth, and some behave conditionally. Enhanced cooperation is a byproduct of integrity.

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Paper provided by University of Connecticut, Department of Economics in its series Working papers with number 2002-36.

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Length: 23 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uct:uconnp:2002-36
Contact details of provider: Postal: University of Connecticut 365 Fairfield Way, Unit 1063 Storrs, CT 06269-1063
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