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Matching, cooperation and HIV in the couple

Author

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  • Azam, Jean-Paul
  • Djemaï, Elodie

Abstract

We examine how cooperation within the couple protects the partners from HIV infection using survey data from southern Africa. The respective impacts of education and cooperation on HIV risk for both wives and husbands are estimated in a joint estimation model. We fully discuss and test the conflictual approach of the couple against a cooperative framework derived from a simple matching model. Our findings suggest that the larger the number of decisions husbands and wives jointly make, the less likely it is that they are infected with HIV. This is robust to assuming that cooperation is endogenous in the wife equation. Freedom and trust are also significantly related to the likelihood of infection for both partners while the women's views about whether marital violence is acceptable are not. These effects may come from a reduced likelihood of extramarital affairs among men and women living in more cooperative partnerships.

Suggested Citation

  • Azam, Jean-Paul & Djemaï, Elodie, 2019. "Matching, cooperation and HIV in the couple," TSE Working Papers 19-991, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
  • Handle: RePEc:tse:wpaper:33357
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Canta Chiara & Dubois Pierre, 2015. "Smoking within the Household: Spousal Peer Effects and Children’s Health Implications," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 15(4), pages 1939-1973, October.
    2. Michael Rendall & Margaret Weden & Melissa Favreault & Hilary Waldron, 2011. "The Protective Effect of Marriage for Survival: A Review and Update," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(2), pages 481-506, May.
    3. Berit Gerritzen, 2016. "Women's Empowerment and HIV Prevention in Rural Malawi," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(3), pages 1-25, July.
    4. Rivers, Douglas & Vuong, Quang H., 1988. "Limited information estimators and exogeneity tests for simultaneous probit models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 347-366, November.
    5. Rachel Cassidy & Marije Groot Bruinderink & Wendy Janssens & Karlijn Morsink, 2018. "The Power to Protect: Household Bargaining and Female Condom Use," CSAE Working Paper Series 2018-08, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    6. Nakamura, Alice & Nakamura, Masao, 1981. "On the Relationships among Several Specification Error Tests Presented by Durbin, Wu, and Hausman," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(6), pages 1583-1588, November.
    7. Arestoff, Florence & Djemai, Elodie, 2016. "Women’s Empowerment Across the Life Cycle and Generations: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 70-87.
    8. Kate Ambler, 2016. "Bargaining with Grandma: The Impact of the South African Pension on Household Decision-Making," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 51(4), pages 900-932.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Couples; Matching; HIV infection; Education; Africa;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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