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Aggregate Returns to Social Capital: Estimates Based on the Augmented Augmented-Solow Model

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  • Hirokazu Ishise

    (Department of Economics, Boston University)

  • Yasuyuki Sawada

    (Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo)

Abstract

This paper estimates the aggregate output elasticity of social capital that characterizes the aggregate returns to social capital. With this aim, we apply Nonneman and Vanhoudt's (1996) augmented version of the augmented Solow model of Mankiw et al. (1992) by including social capital as an additional production input. The estimated output elasticity of social capital is approximately 0.1. While our results largely indicate that social capital positively affects economic growth, the magnitude of the effects is smaller than that of physical and human capital as well as labor inputs. Moreover, the median value of the implied aggregate return of social capital is approximately 9.77% at the global level and, in OECD countries, it is likely to be considerably smaller than the individual returns, suggesting the fallacy of composition. As a by product, the depreciation rate of social capital is estimated to be approximately 10% per annum which is significantly higher than that of physical capital.

Suggested Citation

  • Hirokazu Ishise & Yasuyuki Sawada, 2006. "Aggregate Returns to Social Capital: Estimates Based on the Augmented Augmented-Solow Model," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-413, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
  • Handle: RePEc:tky:fseres:2006cf413
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Aoyagi, Keitaro & Sawada, Yasuyuki & Shoji, Masahiro, 2014. "Does Infrastructure Facilitate Social Capital Accumulation? Evidence from Natural and Artefactual Field Experiments in a Developing Country," Working Papers 65, JICA Research Institute.
    2. Feng Dai & Jianping Qi & Ling Liang, 2011. "Socio-economic development model based on stochastic advance-retreat course: An analysis on US economy in recent 70 years," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 38(5), pages 416-437, April.
    3. repec:eco:journ1:2017-02-15 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Shoji, Masahiro & Aoyagi, Keitaro & Kasahara, Ryuji & Sawada, Yasuyuki & Ueyama, Mika, 2012. "Social Capital Formation and Credit Access: Evidence from Sri Lanka," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(12), pages 2522-2536.
    5. Rauf Gönenç & Oliver Röhn & Christian Beer & Andreas Wörgötter, 2013. "Responding to Key Well-being Challenges in Austria," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1080, OECD Publishing.
    6. Agénor, Pierre-Richard & Dinh, Hinh T., 2015. "Social capital, product imitation and growth with learning externalities," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 41-54.
    7. Puškárová, Paula & Piribauer, Philipp, 2016. "The impact of knowledge spillovers on total factor productivity revisited: New evidence from selected European capital regions," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 335-344.
    8. Paula Puškárová, 2015. "Analýza vplyvu ľudského kapitálu na celkovú produktivitu faktorov v regiónoch EÚ modelom SDM
      [Analysis of the Human Capital Impacts on the Total Factor Productivity in the EU Regions By Means of th
      ," Politická ekonomie, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2015(5), pages 657-675.
    9. Paula Puskarova & Philipp Piribauer, 2014. "The impact of knowledge spillovers on regional total factor productivity. New empirical evidence from selected European countries," ERSA conference papers ersa14p1813, European Regional Science Association.
    10. Shoji, Masahiro & Aoyagi, Keitaro & Kasahara, Ryuji & Sawada, Yasuyuki, 2010. "Motives behind Community Participation," Working Papers 16, JICA Research Institute.

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