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Does subsidising young people to learn to drive promote social inclusion? Evidence from a large controlled experiment in France

Listed author(s):
  • Julie Le Gallo
  • Yannick L'Horty
  • Pascale Petit

We assess the impact of lowering the cost of learning to drive in France by randomly assigning candidates to either of two groups of 18 to 25 years olds. Young people in the “test group” were given a €1000 voucher to pay for their driving lessons and were suported by a welfare centre throughout the time they were learning. Young people in the “control group” retained all the other welfare benefits for the underprivileged. The vouchers were given to 10 000 young people most of whom were not in education, employment or training. We investigate three types of outcome covering driving, housing and employment status. We analyse the specific role of local support in passing the driving test and we specifically take into account the possibility of spillover effects between treated and untreated individuals.

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File URL: http://www.tepp-repec.eu/RePEc/files/teppwp/TEPP-wp-14-15-jlg-yl-pp.pdf
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Paper provided by TEPP in its series TEPP Working Paper with number 2014-15.

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Date of creation: 2014
Handle: RePEc:tep:teppwp:wp14-15
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Université Paris-Est Marne La Vallée, 5 bd Descartes, 77454 Champs sur Marne

Web page: http://www.tepp.eu/

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  1. Bruno Crépon & Esther Duflo & Marc Gurgand & Roland Rathelot & Philippe Zamora, 2013. "Do Labor Market Policies have Displacement Effects? Evidence from a Clustered Randomized Experiment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(2), pages 531-580.
  2. Priya, Tanu & Uteng, André, 2009. "Dynamics of transport and social exclusion: Effects of expensive driver's license," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 130-139, July.
  3. Sarah Baird & Aislinn Bohren & Berk Ozler & Craig McIntosh, 2014. "Designing Experiments to Measure Spillover Effects," Working Papers 2014-11, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
  4. Raphael, Steven & Rice, Lorien, 2002. "Car ownership, employment, and earnings," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 109-130, July.
  5. Abhijit V. Banerjee & Esther Duflo, 2009. "The Experimental Approach to Development Economics," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 1(1), pages 151-178, 05.
  6. Edward Miguel & Michael Kremer, 2004. "Worms: Identifying Impacts on Education and Health in the Presence of Treatment Externalities," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(1), pages 159-217, 01.
  7. Matteo Bobba & Jérémie Gignoux, 2014. "Neighborhood effects and take-up of transfers in integrated social policies: Evidence from Progresa," PSE Working Papers halshs-00646590, HAL.
  8. Lucas, Karen, 2006. "Providing transport for social inclusion within a framework for environmental justice in the UK," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 40(10), pages 801-809, December.
  9. Sylvie Fol & Gabriel Dupuy & Olivier Coutard, 2007. "Transport Policy and the Car Divide in the UK, the US and France: Beyond the Environmental Debate," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(4), pages 802-818, December.
  10. Church, A. & Frost, M. & Sullivan, K., 2000. "Transport and social exclusion in London," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 195-205, July.
  11. Gurley, Tami & Bruce, Donald, 2005. "The effects of car access on employment outcomes for welfare recipients," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 250-272, September.
  12. Philip S. Babcock & John L. Hartman, 2010. "Networks and Workouts: Treatment Size and Status Specific Peer Effects in a Randomized Field Experiment," NBER Working Papers 16581, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Mizuki Kawabata, 2003. "Job access and employment among low-skilled autoless workers in US metropolitan areas," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 35(9), pages 1651-1668, September.
  14. Paul Avrillier & Laurent Hivert & Francis Kramarz, 2010. "Driven Out of Employment? The Impact of the Abolition of National Service on Driving Schools and Aspiring Drivers," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 48(4), pages 784-807, December.
  15. Paul M. Ong, 2002. "Car ownership and welfare-to-work," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(2), pages 239-252.
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