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Les enfants se portent-ils bien ? Mobilite intergenerationnelle et bien-etre de l'enfant au Canada

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  • Corak, Miles

Abstract

L'article examine le cadre conceptuel de la mobilite intergenerationnelle en regard de la relation entre les revenus des parents et ceux des enfants ainsi que le degre et les sources de la mobilite intergenerationnelle au Canada. La principale conclusion est la suivante : la societe canadienne se caracterise par un degre relativement eleve de mobilite intergenerationnelle et, selon l'information disponible, les enfants qui grandissent dans une famille a faible revenu ne sont pas condamnes a toucher de faibles revenus a l'age adulte. A cet egard, le Canada se compare avantageusement a bon nombre d'autres pays, la mobilite y etant en moyenne plus elevee qu'aux Etats-Unis et qu'au Royaume-Uni et similaire a celle observee dans certains des pays les mieux classes a ce chapitre. Les causes de ce phenomene se rapportent a l'acces a une education de grande qualite et aux investissements non monetaires de grande qualite dans les enfants. Cependant, aucun element probant ne permet de lier le niveau du revenu familial et la nature de ces investissements.

Suggested Citation

  • Corak, Miles, 2001. "Les enfants se portent-ils bien ? Mobilite intergenerationnelle et bien-etre de l'enfant au Canada," Direction des etudes analytiques : documents de recherche 2001171f, Statistics Canada, Direction des etudes analytiques.
  • Handle: RePEc:stc:stcp3f:2001171f
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    6. Lars Osberg, 2001. "Needs and Wants: What is Social Progress and How Should it be Measured," The Review of Economic Performance and Social Progress,in: Andrew Sharpe, Executive Director & France St-Hilaire, Vice-President , Research & Keith Banting, Di (ed.), The Review of Economic Performance and Social Progress 2001: The Longest Decade: Canada in the 1990s, volume 1 Centre for the Study of Living Standards;The Institutute for Research on Public Policy.
    7. Paul Jenkins & Brian O'Reilly, 2001. "Monetary Policy and the Economic Well-being of Canadians," The Review of Economic Performance and Social Progress,in: Andrew Sharpe, Executive Director & France St-Hilaire, Vice-President , Research & Keith Banting, Di (ed.), The Review of Economic Performance and Social Progress 2001: The Longest Decade: Canada in the 1990s, volume 1 Centre for the Study of Living Standards;The Institutute for Research on Public Policy.
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    10. Grawe, Nathan D., 2001. "In Search of Intergenerational Credit Constraints Among Canadian Men: Quantile Versus Mean Regression Tests for Binding Credit Constraints," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2001158e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
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