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Stable Partial Agglomeration in a New Economic Geography Model with Urban Frictions

  • Sylvain Barde

    (University of Kent)

This paper extends the Puga (1999) model by introducing urban frictions. It assumes that the agglomeration of manufacturing in a city imposes a cost on the inhabitants of the agglomerated region. Furthermore, an implicit function methodology is developed to provide a numerical stability function that does not require prior analytical work. Simulations reveal that these numerical stability conditions are consistent with the original Puga (1999) analytical predictions. The central finding is that the extension significantly alters the agglomeration properties of the original Puga framework. In particular, partial agglomeration becomes a stable long run outcome in both with and without migration. Furthermore, the level of sensitivity of the agglomeration to the friction cost market parameters is shown to be different in the both cases. This outlines the need to evaluate the imperfectness of migration when modifying the urban geography as a policy implication.

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Paper provided by Sciences Po in its series Sciences Po publications with number 07/02.

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Date of creation: Jan 2007
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Handle: RePEc:spo:wpmain:info:hdl:2441/8001
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  1. Wasmer, Etienne & Zenou, Yves, 2005. "Equilibrium Search Unemployment with Explicit Spatial Frictions," IZA Discussion Papers 1465, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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  3. Puga, Diego, 1999. "The rise and fall of regional inequalities," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 303-334, February.
  4. Zenou, Yves & Smith, Tony E., 1995. "Efficiency wages, involuntary unemployment and urban spatial structure," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 547-573, August.
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  8. Smith, Tony E & Zenou, Yves, 2003. "Spatial Mismatch, Search Effort and Urban Spatial Structure," CEPR Discussion Papers 3731, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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  10. Ellison, G. & Glaeser, E.L., 1994. "Geographic Concentration in U.S. Manufacturing Industries: A Dartboard Approach," Working papers 94-27, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  11. Henry Overman, 2003. "Can We Learn Anything from Economic Geography Proper?," CEP Discussion Papers dp0586, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
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  13. Jan K. Brueckner & Jacques-FranÁois Thisse & Yves Zenou, 2002. "Local Labor Markets, Job Matching, and Urban Location," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 43(1), pages 155-171, February.
  14. Gianmarco Ottaviano & Takatoshi Tabuchi & Jacques-FranÁois Thisse, 2002. "Agglomeration and Trade Revisited," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 43(2), pages 409-436, May.
  15. Wasmer, Etienne & Zenou, Yves, 2002. "Does City Structure Affect Job Search and Welfare?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(3), pages 515-541, May.
  16. Brueckner, Jan K. & Zenou, Yves, 1999. "Harris-Todaro models with a land market," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 317-339, May.
  17. Brueckner, Jan K. & Martin, Richard W., 1997. "Spatial mismatch: An equilibrium analysis," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 693-714, November.
  18. Paul Krugman, 1990. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," NBER Working Papers 3275, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  19. Martin, Ron, 1999. "The New 'Geographical Turn' in Economics: Some Critical Reflections," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 23(1), pages 65-91, January.
  20. Paul Krugman, 1998. "Space: The Final Frontier," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 161-174, Spring.
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