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Are women less persistent? Evidence from submissions to a nationwide meeting of Economics

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  • Paula Pereda

    ()

  • Matsunaga, Diaz, Borges, Chalco, Rocha, Narita, Brenck

Abstract

Female underrepresentation in high-profile career positions has relevant impacts on firms' outcomes and public policies. In the academic profession, women's participation decreases as they evolve in their career. To understand the lack of women in the field of economics in Brazil, we investigate the decision to submit papers to the largest conference in the country (Brazilian Meeting of Economics), as an important achievement in the profession. We explore a novel panel dataset of researchers and match them with web-scraped data of their résumés to test gender differences in the probability of submitting an article one year after having an article (same or new) rejected in the previous year. Our findings suggest that women desist 5.9 percentage points more than men when facing rejection. We also find evidence that younger women give up more and that the quality of the undergraduate program matters to determine the difference in the desistance rate between men and women. We argue that higher quality institutions might self-select women who are more competitive.

Suggested Citation

  • Paula Pereda & Matsunaga, Diaz, Borges, Chalco, Rocha, Narita, Brenck, 2020. "Are women less persistent? Evidence from submissions to a nationwide meeting of Economics," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2020_19, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP).
  • Handle: RePEc:spa:wpaper:2020wpecon19
    as

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    File URL: http://www.repec.eae.fea.usp.br/documentos/Pereda_19WP.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    3. Maria Apostolova-Mihaylova & William Cooper & Gail Hoyt & Emily C. Marshall, 2015. "Heterogeneous gender effects under loss aversion in the economics classroom: A field experiment," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 81(4), pages 980-994, April.
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    5. David Card & Stefano DellaVigna & Patricia Funk & Nagore Iriberri, 2020. "Are Referees and Editors in Economics Gender Neutral?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 135(1), pages 269-327.
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Female underrepresentation; competitive behavior; academic conferences;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • A11 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Role of Economics; Role of Economists

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