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Industrial Growth and Structural Change: Brazil in a Long-Run Perspective

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  • Dante Aldrighi
  • Renato P. Colistete

Abstract

This paper presents a long-run analysis of industrial growth and structural change in Brazil, from the coffee export economy in the nineteenth century to the present day. We focus on Brazil’s high economic growth in most of the twentieth century and the disruption caused by the collapse of debt-led growth in the early 1980s. We then examine the recent trends in economic growth and structural change, with a sectoral analysis of output, employment and productivity growth. Employing new data and estimates, we identify a sharp break with the earlier period of high outuput and productivity growth in Brazil’s manufacturing industry before the 1980s. From the 1990s, the relatively successful process of learning and technological advance by manufacturing firms that took place since the early industrialization has lost strength and Brazil’s productivity growth has declined and stagnated.

Suggested Citation

  • Dante Aldrighi & Renato P. Colistete, 2013. "Industrial Growth and Structural Change: Brazil in a Long-Run Perspective," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2013_10, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP).
  • Handle: RePEc:spa:wpaper:2013wpecon10
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    File URL: http://www.repec.eae.fea.usp.br/documentos/RenatoDante10WP.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Past and Present: Brazil’s Unfulfilled Expectations
      by sebastianfleitas in NEP-HIS blog on 2014-02-03 19:57:01

    RePEc Biblio mentions

    As found on the RePEc Biblio, the curated bibliography for Economics:
    1. > Economic History > Regional Economic History > Latin American Economic History > Economic History of Brazil

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    Cited by:

    1. Mario Cimoli & Jose Antonio Ocampo & Gabriel Porcile & Nunzia Saporito, 2020. "Choosing sides in the trilemma: international financial cycles and structural change in developing economies," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(7), pages 740-761, October.
    2. André Roncaglia, 2016. "Structural Change, De-Industrialization And Inflation Inertia In Brazil," Anais do XLII Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 42nd Brazilian Economics Meeting] 077, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    3. Eva Yamila Catela & Mario Cimoli & Gabriel Porcile, 2015. "Productivity and Structural Heterogeneity in the Brazilian Manufacturing Sector: Trends and Determinants," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(2), pages 232-252, June.
    4. André Roncaglia de Carvalho, 2013. "Inflation, structural change and conflict in post-disinflation Brazil: a structuralist appraisal," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2013_25, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP).
    5. Hui Zheng & Xiaodong Liu & Yajun Xu & Hairong Mu, 2021. "Economic Spillover Effects of Industrial Structure Upgrading in China’s Coastal Economic Rims," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(7), pages 1-14, March.
    6. André Roncaglia de Carvalho, 2014. "Structural change, de-industrialization and inflation inertia in Brazil," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2014_29, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP).
    7. Cimoli, Mario & Pereima, João Basilio & Porcile, Gabriel, 2019. "A technology gap interpretation of growth paths in Asia and Latin America," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 125-136.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Industrial Growth; Structural Change; Brazil;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • N66 - Economic History - - Manufacturing and Construction - - - Latin America; Caribbean
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • L60 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - General

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