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Monetary Systems

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  • Julia M. Puaschunder

    () (The New School, Department of Economics, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis, New York, USA)

Abstract

Throughout modern international finance, different monetary regimes existed. International monetary arrangements initially arose from the need to provide international trade with easy means of settling trans-border payments (Semmler 2019). For centuries, both domestic and international trade was carried out using gold and silver (Semmler 2019). The Gold standard during the Interwar Period since 1870, the Bretton Woods system and the following Euro currency introduction. This essay summarizing the differences between the three Monetary and currency systems: Gold standard, Bretton Woods and Euro-System and highlights the success and failures of the different approaches to guide monetary matters throughout history.

Suggested Citation

  • Julia M. Puaschunder, 2020. "Monetary Systems," Working papers 001jm1, Research Association for Interdisciplinary Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:smo:kpaper:001jm1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Markus K. Brunnermeier & Yuliy Sannikov, 2014. "A Macroeconomic Model with a Financial Sector," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(2), pages 379-421, February.
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    3. Barro, Robert J. & Gordon, David B., 1983. "Rules, discretion and reputation in a model of monetary policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 101-121.
    4. Paul De Grauwe, 2012. "The Governance of a Fragile Eurozone," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 45(3), pages 255-268, September.
    5. Schleer, Frauke & Semmler, Willi, 2015. "Financial sector and output dynamics in the euro area: Non-linearities reconsidered," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 235-263.
    6. Paul De Grauwe, 2012. "A Fragile Eurozone in Search of a Better Governance," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 43(1), pages 1-30.
    7. Cristina Arellano, 2008. "Default Risk and Income Fluctuations in Emerging Economies," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(3), pages 690-712, June.
    8. Willi Semmler & Christian R. Proaño, 2015. "Escape Routes from Sovereign Default Risk in the Euro Area," International Symposia in Economic Theory and Econometrics, in: William A. Barnett & Fredj Jawadi (ed.),Monetary Policy in the Context of the Financial Crisis: New Challenges and Lessons, volume 24, pages 163-193, Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    9. Markus K. Brunnermeier & Martin Oehmke, 2013. "The Maturity Rat Race," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 68(2), pages 483-521, April.
    10. repec:eme:isetep:s1571-038620150000024018 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Manuel Arellano, 2014. "Uncertainty, Persistence, And Heterogeneity: A Panel Data Perspective," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 12(5), pages 1127-1153, October.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bretton Woods System; Central Banks; Currency System; Economic Stability; Euro Currency; Finance; Fiscal Policy; Gold standard; History; International Trade; Monetary Policy;

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