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Need Singapore Fear Floating? A DSGE-VAR Approach

Author

Listed:
  • Hwee Kwan Chow

    () (School of Economics, Singapore Management University)

  • Paul D. McNelis

    () (SDepartment of Finance, Graduate School of Business Administration, Fordham University)

Abstract

This paper uses a DSGE-VAR model to examine the managed exchange-rate system at work in Singapore and asks if the country has any reason to fear floating the exchange rate with a Taylor rule inflation-targeting mechanism that uses the short term interest rate instead of the exchange rate as the benchmark monetary policy instrument. Our simulation results show that the use of a more flexible exchange rate system will reduce volatility in inflation and investment but consumption volatility will increase. Overall, there are neither signi ficant welfare gains or losses in the regime shift. Given the highly open and trade dependent nature of the Singapore economy where the policy preference is for exchange rate stability, there is no impetus to abandon the present monetary regime.

Suggested Citation

  • Hwee Kwan Chow & Paul D. McNelis, 2010. "Need Singapore Fear Floating? A DSGE-VAR Approach," Working Papers 29-2010, Singapore Management University, School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:siu:wpaper:29-2010
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    File URL: https://mercury.smu.edu.sg/rsrchpubupload/18149/NeedSingaporeFearFloating.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Guillermo A. Calvo & Carmen M. Reinhart, 2002. "Fear of Floating," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(2), pages 379-408.
    2. Hwee Kwan Chow, 2004. "A VAR Analysis of Singapore’s Monetary Transmission Mechanism," Working Papers 19-2004, Singapore Management University, School of Economics.
    3. Marco Del Negro & Frank Schorfheide, 2004. "Priors from General Equilibrium Models for VARS," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 45(2), pages 643-673, May.
    4. Michael B. Devereux, 2003. "A Tale of Two Currencies: the Asian Crisis and the Exchange Rate Regimes of Hong Kong and Singapore," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 11(1), pages 38-54, February.
    5. Sungbae An & Heedon Kang, 2011. "Oil Shocks in a DSGE Model for the Korean Economy," NBER Chapters,in: Commodity Prices and Markets, East Asia Seminar on Economics, Volume 20, pages 295-321 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Joseph D. ALBA & Wai–Mun CHIA & Donghyun PARK, 2011. "Foreign Output Shocks and Monetary Policy Regimes in Small Open Economies: A DSGE Evaluation of East Asia," Economic Growth Centre Working Paper Series 1105, Nanyang Technological University, School of Social Sciences, Economic Growth Centre.
    2. Berganza, Juan Carlos & Broto, Carmen, 2012. "Flexible inflation targets, forex interventions and exchange rate volatility in emerging countries," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 428-444.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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