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A VAR Analysis of Singapore’s Monetary Transmission Mechanism

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  • Hwee Kwan Chow

    () (School of Economics and Social Sciences, Singapore Management University)

Abstract

The Singapore economy has experienced greater business cycle fluctuations in recent years, being subject to recurrent shocks from the external environment. Given the extreme openness of the economy—Singapore’s export share of GDP is approximately 180%—it is not surprising that the main cause of the increase in economic volatility is a rise in the frequency and magnitude of exogenous shocks. These include the downswing in the global electronics industry in 1996–97, the Asian financial crisis in 1997–98, the burst of the information technology bubble in 2001, and the outbreak of the SARS respiratory disease in 2003. Such a close sequence of external shocks no doubt induced turbulences in the economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Hwee Kwan Chow, 2004. "A VAR Analysis of Singapore’s Monetary Transmission Mechanism," Working Papers 19-2004, Singapore Management University, School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:siu:wpaper:19-2004
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    File URL: https://mercury.smu.edu.sg/rsrchpubupload/4224/Sing_MTM.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mark Gertler & Jordi Gali & Richard Clarida, 1999. "The Science of Monetary Policy: A New Keynesian Perspective," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(4), pages 1661-1707, December.
    2. By James Morsink & Tamim Bayoumi, 2001. "A Peek Inside the Black Box: The Monetary Transmission Mechanism in Japan," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 48(1), pages 1-2.
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    8. Phang, Sock-Yong, 2004. "House prices and aggregate consumption: do they move together? Evidence from Singapore," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 101-119, June.
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    10. Kim, Soyoung, 1999. "Do monetary policy shocks matter in the G-7 countries? Using common identifying assumptions about monetary policy across countries," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 387-412, August.
    11. Ben S.C. Fung, 2002. "A VAR analysis of the effects of monetary policy in East Asia," BIS Working Papers 119, Bank for International Settlements.
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    13. Mark Gertler & Jordi Gali & Richard Clarida, 1999. "The Science of Monetary Policy: A New Keynesian Perspective," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(4), pages 1661-1707, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hwee Kwan Chow, 2010. "Managing Capital Flows: The Case of Singapore," Chapters,in: Managing Capital Flows, chapter 14 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Tng Boon Hwa & Mala Raghavan & Teh Tian Huey, 2017. "Macroeconomic surveillance of portfolio flows and its real effects: Malaysia's experience," IFC Bulletins chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Statistical implications of the new financial landscape, volume 43 Bank for International Settlements.
    3. Hwee Kwan Chow & Paul D. McNelis, 2010. "Need Singapore Fear Floating? A DSGE-VAR Approach," Working Papers 29-2010, Singapore Management University, School of Economics.
    4. Tng & Kwek, 2015. "Financial stress, economic activity and monetary policy in the ASEAN-5 economies," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(48), pages 5169-5185, October.
    5. Chow, Hwee Kwan & Lim, G.C. & McNelis, Paul D., 2014. "Monetary regime choice in Singapore: Would a Taylor rule outperform exchange-rate management?," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 63-81.

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