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Peer Networks and Tobacco Consumption in South Africa

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  • Alfred Kechia Mukong

Abstract

This paper deepens the empirical analysis of peer networks by considering simultaneously their effects smoking participation and smoking intensity. Peer network is key in determining the smoking behaviour of youths, but the magnitude of the effects is still debated, questioned and inconclusive. I used a control function approach, a two-step least square and the fixed effect method to address the potential endogeneity of peer network. The results suggest positive and signicant peer effects on smoking participation and intensity. While the magnitude of the estimates of smoking participation varies across methodological approaches (ranging between 4 and 20 percent), that of smoking intensity ranges between 3 and 22 percent. Including older adults in the peer reference group increases the peer eects. The findings suggest that policies (excise tax) that directly aect the decision to smoke and the smoking intensity of the peer reference group are likely to aect own smoking behaviour.

Suggested Citation

  • Alfred Kechia Mukong, 2016. "Peer Networks and Tobacco Consumption in South Africa," Working Papers 586, Economic Research Southern Africa.
  • Handle: RePEc:rza:wpaper:586
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    File URL: http://www.econrsa.org/node/1194
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Peer network; Smoking behavior; Control function; South Africa;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • C36 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Instrumental Variables (IV) Estimation

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