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Common Correlated Effects Estimation of Dynamic Panels with Cross-Sectional Dependence

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  • T. DE GROOTE

    ()

  • G. EVERAERT

    ()

Abstract

We study estimation of dynamic panel data models with error cross-sectional dependence generated by an unobserved common factor. We show that for a temporally dependent factor, the standard within groups (WG) estimator is inconsistent even as both N and T tend to infinity. Next we investigate the properties of the common correlated effects pooled (CCEP) estimator of Pesaran [Econometrica, 2006] which eliminates the cross-sectional dependence using cross-sectional averages of the data. In contrast to the static case, the CCEP estimator is only consistent if next to N also T tends to infinity. It is shown that for the most relevant parameter settings, the asymptotic bias of the CCEP estimator is larger than that of the infeasible WG estimator, which includes the common factors as regressors. Restricting the CCEP estimator results in a somewhat smaller asymptotic bias. The small sample proper- ties of the various estimators are analysed using Monte Carlo experiments. The simulation results suggest that the CCEP estimator can be used to estimate dynamic panel data models provided T is not too small. The size of N is of less importance.

Suggested Citation

  • T. De Groote & G. Everaert, 2011. "Common Correlated Effects Estimation of Dynamic Panels with Cross-Sectional Dependence," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 11/723, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
  • Handle: RePEc:rug:rugwps:11/723
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. M. Hashem Pesaran, 2006. "Estimation and Inference in Large Heterogeneous Panels with a Multifactor Error Structure," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 74(4), pages 967-1012, July.
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    7. Peter C. B. Phillips & Donggyu Sul, 2003. "Dynamic panel estimation and homogeneity testing under cross section dependence *," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 6(1), pages 217-259, June.
    8. Nickell, Stephen J, 1981. "Biases in Dynamic Models with Fixed Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(6), pages 1417-1426, November.
    9. Everaert, Gerdie & Pozzi, Lorenzo, 2007. "Bootstrap-based bias correction for dynamic panels," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 1160-1184, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Temple, Jonathan & Van de Sijpe, Nicolas, 2017. "Foreign aid and domestic absorption," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, pages 431-443.
    2. Chudik, Alexander & Pesaran, M. Hashem, 2015. "Common correlated effects estimation of heterogeneous dynamic panel data models with weakly exogenous regressors," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 188(2), pages 393-420.
    3. Alexander Chudik & M. Hashem Pesaran, 2013. "Large Panel Data Models with Cross-Sectional Dependence: A Survey," CESifo Working Paper Series 4371, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:1:p:501-526 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Dimitrios Bakas & Theodore Panagiotidis & Gianluigi Pelloni, 2017. "Regional And Sectoral Evidence Of The Macroeconomic Effects Of Labor Reallocation: A Panel Data Analysis," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(1), pages 501-526, January.
    6. Delwar Hossain, 2014. "Differential Impacts of Foreign Capital and Remittance Inflows on Domestic Savings in the Developing Countries: A Dynamic Heterogeneous Panel Analysis," Departmental Working Papers 2014-07, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cross-Sectional Dependence; Dynamic Panel; Common Correlated Effects;

    JEL classification:

    • C13 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Estimation: General
    • C15 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Statistical Simulation Methods: General
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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