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Policy uncertainty and international financial markets: the case of Brexit

Author

Listed:
  • Ansgar Belke
  • Irina Dubova
  • Thomas Osowski

Abstract

This study assesses the impact of Brexit uncertainty on the UK and also on international financial markets, for the first and the second statistical moments. As financial markets are highly linked in general and several countries apart from the UK might be negatively affected, one may expect that the (uncertainty about) Brexit does not only have an impact on financial markets in Britain. By analyzing the impact of Brexit on financial markets, we might also get some insights about market’s expectations about the magnitude of the economic impact beyond the UK and which country beyond the UK may be mostly affected. For this purpose, we firstly use the Diebold and Yilmaz (2012) and the Hafner and Herwartz (2008) method to estimate the time-varying interactions between UK policy uncertainty, which to a large extent is attributed to Brexit uncertainty, and UK financial market volatilities (second statistical moment) and try to identify the direction of causality among them. Secondly, we use two other measures of the perceived probability of a Brexit, namely daily data released by Betfair as well as results of polls published by Bloomberg. Based on these datasets and using both panel as well as single-country SUR estimation methods, we analyse the Brexit effect on the levels of stock returns, sovereign CDS, ten-year interest rates of 19 different countries predominantly from Europe as well as of the British pound and of the euro (first statistical moment). We show that Brexit-caused policy uncertainty will continuously cause instability in key financial markets and has the potential to do damage to the UK’s and other European countries’ real economy, even in the medium run. The main losers outside of the UK are the GIIPS economies.

Suggested Citation

  • Ansgar Belke & Irina Dubova & Thomas Osowski, 2016. "Policy uncertainty and international financial markets: the case of Brexit," ROME Working Papers 201607, ROME Network.
  • Handle: RePEc:rmn:wpaper:201607
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. FrancisX. Diebold & Kamil Yilmaz, 2009. "Measuring Financial Asset Return and Volatility Spillovers, with Application to Global Equity Markets," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(534), pages 158-171, January.
    2. Stefano d'Addona & Ilaria Musumeci, 2013. "The British opt-out from the European Monetary Union: empirical evidence from monetary policy rules," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(23), pages 1783-1795, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:kap:iecepo:v:16:y:2019:i:1:d:10.1007_s10368-018-00424-z is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Thiem, Christopher, 2018. "Cross-category, trans-Pacific spillovers of policy uncertainty and financial market volatility," Ruhr Economic Papers 782, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    3. repec:eee:riibaf:v:46:y:2018:i:c:p:516-527 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Caporale, Guglielmo Maria & Spagnolo, Fabio & Spagnolo, Nicola, 2018. "Exchange rates and macro news in emerging markets," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 516-527.
    5. repec:zbw:rwikon:171736 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Brexit; causality tests; financial instability; Pound sterling; uncertainty; spillovers;

    JEL classification:

    • C58 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Financial Econometrics
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets

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