IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ris/aiccon/2016_152.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

“De (corporate responsibility) gustibus est misurandum”: heterogeneity and consensus around CR indicators

Author

Listed:
  • Becchetti, Leonardo

    () (Associazione Italiana per la Cultura della Cooperazione e del Non Profit)

  • Semplici, Lorenzo

    () (Associazione Italiana per la Cultura della Cooperazione e del Non Profit)

  • Tridente, Michele

    () (Associazione Italiana per la Cultura della Cooperazione e del Non Profit)

Abstract

We investigate with an ad hoc survey respondents’ tastes about the different corporate responsibility (CR) items typically used by CR rating agencies. The hypotheses of equal average value weights given to different CR items and equal variance (which we consider as a proxy of the inverse of consensus on the importance of an indicator) are strongly rejected by our data both in our overall suvey sample and in more homogeneous subsamples based on gender, age, education and religious beliefs. We as well frequently reject the hypothesis that value weights for the same CR item are the same across different subpopulations in gender subsamples since women attribute significantly higher weights than men to many CR items when we do not correct for young respondents’ oversampling.

Suggested Citation

  • Becchetti, Leonardo & Semplici, Lorenzo & Tridente, Michele, 2016. "“De (corporate responsibility) gustibus est misurandum”: heterogeneity and consensus around CR indicators," AICCON Working Papers 152-2016, Associazione Italiana per la Cultura della Cooperazione e del Non Profit.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:aiccon:2016_152
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.aiccon.it/pubblicazione/152-de-corporate-responsibility-gustibus-est-misurandum/
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Robert J. MacCulloch & Rafael Di Tella & Andrew J. Oswald, 2001. "Preferences over Inflation and Unemployment: Evidence from Surveys of Happiness," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 335-341, March.
    2. Leonardo Becchetti & Rocco Ciciretti & Ambrogio D'Alò, 2016. "Fishing the Corporate Social Responsibility Risk Factors," CEIS Research Paper 368, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 07 Feb 2017.
    3. Lauren Cohen & Andrea Frazzini & Christopher J. Malloy, 2012. "Hiring Cheerleaders: Board Appointments of "Independent" Directors," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 58(6), pages 1039-1058, June.
    4. Winkelmann, Liliana & Winkelmann, Rainer, 1998. "Why Are the Unemployed So Unhappy? Evidence from Panel Data," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 65(257), pages 1-15, February.
    5. Bradley Sleeper & Kenneth Schneider & Paula Weber & James Weber, 2006. "Scale and Study of Student Attitudes Toward Business Education’s Role in Addressing Social Issues," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 68(4), pages 381-391, November.
    6. Catherine M. Paul & Donald Siegel, 2006. "Corporate social responsibility and economic performance," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 26(3), pages 207-211, December.
    7. Rachel Croson & Uri Gneezy, 2009. "Gender Differences in Preferences," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(2), pages 448-474, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    corporate responsibility; gender effect; environmental sustainability;

    JEL classification:

    • D21 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Theory
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • L21 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Business Objectives of the Firm
    • M14 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Corporate Culture; Diversity; Social Responsibility

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ris:aiccon:2016_152. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Paolo Venturi). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/aiccoea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.