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Shooting down the price: evidence from mafia homicides and housing market volatility

Author

Listed:
  • Michele Battisti

    () (Dipartimento di Giurisprudenza, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Italy; Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis)

  • Giovanni Bernardo

    () (Dipartimento di Giurisprudenza, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Italy)

  • Andrea Mario Lavezzi

    () (Dipartimento di Giurisprudenza, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Italy)

  • Giuseppe Maggio

    () (Department of Geography, University of Sussex, UK)

Abstract

In this work, we assess the role of a specific type of organized crime in influencing choices on where living within the city territory, and consequently, volatility in house prices. More specifically, we test how organized crime killing may influence house pricing behaviors. Firstly, we show evidences about how organized crime is associated with higher inequality of housing prices for Italian cities in 2011. Then, by collecting and geo referencing data on the city of Naples for the period 2002-2016, we test for the direct influence of homicides on the relevant territory, as on the neighboring districts. Results show a negative and significant impact of killing on the house prices either for sales or for rents and a positive effect in neighboring district, driving increases in within-city inequality.

Suggested Citation

  • Michele Battisti & Giovanni Bernardo & Andrea Mario Lavezzi & Giuseppe Maggio, 2019. "Shooting down the price: evidence from mafia homicides and housing market volatility," Working Paper series 19-05, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
  • Handle: RePEc:rim:rimwps:19-05
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Berry, Christopher R. & Glaeser, Edward L., 2005. "Divergence of Human Capital Levels across Cities," Working Paper Series rwp05-057, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    organized crime; spatial interactions; panel data estimations;

    JEL classification:

    • C40 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - General
    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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