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Insiders, Outsiders, and the Role of Local Enforcement in Forest Management: An Example from Tanzania

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  • Robinson, Elizabeth J.Z.
  • Albers, Heidi J.
  • Lokina, Razack
  • Ngeleza, Guyslain

Abstract

Typically both local villagers (“insiders”) and non-locals (“outsiders”) extract products from protected forests even though the activities are illegal. Our paper suggests that, depending on the relative ecological damage caused by each group, budget-constrained forest managers may be able to reduce total forest degradation by legalizing “insider” extraction in return for local villagers involvement in enforcement activities. We illustrate this through the development of a game-theoretic model that considers explicitly the interaction between the forest manager who can combine a limited enforcement budget with legalization of insider resource extraction and livelihood projects

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  • Robinson, Elizabeth J.Z. & Albers, Heidi J. & Lokina, Razack & Ngeleza, Guyslain, 2012. "Insiders, Outsiders, and the Role of Local Enforcement in Forest Management: An Example from Tanzania," Discussion Papers dp-12-07-efd, Resources For the Future.
  • Handle: RePEc:rff:dpaper:dp-12-07-efd
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Clarke, Harry R. & Reed, William J. & Shrestha, Ram M., 1993. "Optimal enforcement of property rights on developing country forests subject to illegal logging," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 271-293, September.
    2. Gary S. Becker, 1974. "Crime and Punishment: An Economic Approach," NBER Chapters,in: Essays in the Economics of Crime and Punishment, pages 1-54 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Robinson, Elizabeth J.Z. & Albers, Heidi J. & Williams, Jeffrey C., 2008. "Spatial and temporal modeling of community non-timber forest extraction," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 234-245, November.
    4. Johannesen, Anne Borge & Skonhoft, Anders, 2005. "Tourism, poaching and wildlife conservation: what can integrated conservation and development projects accomplish?," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 208-226, October.
    5. Muller, Jeffrey & Albers, Heidi J., 2004. "Enforcement, payments, and development projects near protected areas: how the market setting determines what works where," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 185-204, June.
    6. López-Feldman, Alejandro & Wilen, James E., 2008. "Poverty and spatial dimensions of non-timber forest extraction," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(05), pages 621-642, October.
    7. Albers, Heidi J. & Robinson, Elizabeth J.Z., 2011. "The Trees and the Bees: Using Enforcement and Income Projects to Protect Forests and Rural Livelihoods Through Spatial Joint Production," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 1-15, December.
    8. Behera, Bhagirath & Engel, Stefanie, 2006. "Institutional analysis of evolution of joint forest management in India: A new institutional economics approach," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 350-362, June.
    9. Robinson, Elizabeth J. Z. & Lokina, Razack B., 2012. "Efficiency, enforcement and revenue tradeoffs in participatory forest management: an example from Tanzania," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 17(01), pages 1-20, February.
    10. Lise, Wietze, 2000. "Factors influencing people's participation in forest management in India," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 379-392, September.
    11. Robinson, Elizabeth J. Z., 2008. "Wanted dead and alive: to what extent are hunting and protection of an endangered species compatible?," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(05), pages 607-620, October.
    12. Albers, H.J., 2010. "Spatial modeling of extraction and enforcement in developing country protected areas," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 165-179, April.
    13. Robinson, Elizabeth J.Z. & Albers, Heidi J. & Busby, Gwenlyn M., 2013. "The impact of buffer zone size and management on illegal extraction, park protection, and enforcement," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 96-103.
    14. Elizabeth J. Z. Robinson & Jeffrey C. Williams & Heidi J. Albers, 2002. "The Influence of Markets and Policy on Spatial Patterns of Non-Timber Forest Product Extraction," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 78(2), pages 260-271.
    15. Gibson, Clark C. & Williams, John T. & Ostrom, Elinor, 2005. "Local Enforcement and Better Forests," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 273-284, February.
    16. Chakraborty, Rabindra Nath, 2001. "Stability and outcomes of common property institutions in forestry: evidence from the Terai region of Nepal," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 341-353, February.
    17. Elizabeth J. Z. Robinson & Heidi J. Albers & Jeffrey C. Williams, 2011. "Sizing Reserves within a Landscape: The Roles of Villagers’ Reactions and the Ecological-Socioeconomic Setting," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 87(2), pages 233-249.
    18. Ligon, Ethan & Narain, Urvashi, 1999. "Government Management of Village Commons: Comparing Two Forest Policies," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 272-289, May.
    19. Robinson, Elizabeth J.Z. & Albers, Heidi J. & Kirama, Stephen L., 2012. "The Role of Incentives for Sustainable Implementation of Marine Protected Areas: An Example from Tanzania," Discussion Papers dp-12-03-efd, Resources For the Future.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mazunda, John & Shively, Gerald, 2015. "Measuring the forest and income impacts of forest user group participation under Malawi's Forest Co-management Program," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 262-273.

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    Keywords

    participatory forest management; local enforcement; Tanzania; charcoal production; non-timber forest products; bee keeping;

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