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Distance Friction and the Cost of Hunting in Tropical Forest


  • Anders H. Sirén
  • Juan-Camilo Cardenas
  • Peter Hambäck
  • Kalle Parvinen


Empirical studies of tropical forest hunting have shown the existence of marked spatial gradients of hunting effort, game harvest, and animal abundance, as hunters mostly hunt near villages, roads, and rivers. The mechanisms underlying these patterns have, however, hitherto been poorly known. This article presents a spatial bioeconomic model based on the concept of distance friction, that is, an increasing marginal cost of distance. The model is validated by comparison with an economic field experiment with Amazonian hunters and with previous empirical data on hunting.

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  • Anders H. Sirén & Juan-Camilo Cardenas & Peter Hambäck & Kalle Parvinen, 2013. "Distance Friction and the Cost of Hunting in Tropical Forest," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 89(3), pages 558-574.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:89:y:2013:iii:1:p:558-574

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Randall, Alan & Stoll, John R, 1980. "Consumer's Surplus in Commodity Space," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 449-455, June.
    2. Robinson, Elizabeth J.Z. & Albers, Heidi J. & Williams, Jeffrey C., 2008. "Spatial and temporal modeling of community non-timber forest extraction," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 234-245, November.
    3. Juan Camilo Cardenas & Jeffrey Carpenter, 2008. "Behavioural Development Economics: Lessons from Field Labs in the Developing World," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(3), pages 311-338.
    4. Skonhoft, Anders & Solstad, Jan Tore, 1996. "Wildlife management, illegal hunting and conflicts. A bioeconomic analysis," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 1(02), pages 165-181, May.
    5. Richard T. Carson & Nicholas E. Flores & Kerry M. Martin & Jennifer L. Wright, 1996. "Contingent Valuation and Revealed Preference Methodologies: Comparing the Estimates for Quasi-Public Goods," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 72(1), pages 80-99.
    6. Albers, H.J., 2010. "Spatial modeling of extraction and enforcement in developing country protected areas," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 165-179, April.
    7. Elizabeth J. Z. Robinson & Jeffrey C. Williams & Heidi J. Albers, 2002. "The Influence of Markets and Policy on Spatial Patterns of Non-Timber Forest Product Extraction," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 78(2), pages 260-271.
    8. Hanemann, W Michael, 1991. "Willingness to Pay and Willingness to Accept: How Much Can They Differ?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(3), pages 635-647, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sirén, Anders & Parvinen, Kalle, 2015. "A spatial bioeconomic model of the harvest of wild plants and animals," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 201-210.

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    JEL classification:

    • Q57 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Ecological Economics


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