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Wildlife management, illegal hunting and conflicts. A bioeconomic analysis

Author

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  • Skonhoft, Anders
  • Solstad, Jan Tore

Abstract

The paper analyzes the conflict between illegal and legal exploitation of wildlife species in an East African context. In the model there are two agents, an agency managing a national park of fixed area and a group of local people living in the vicinity of the park. The park agency has the legal right to exploit the wildlife, while the local people hunt illegally. Because of the property rights, the park agency has incentives to invest in the stock of wildlife, while the behaviour of the local people is steered by short-term considerations. The model is analyzed in two steps. Firstly, the market solution is studied. Next, the model is examined when user and property rights are given to the local people.

Suggested Citation

  • Skonhoft, Anders & Solstad, Jan Tore, 1996. "Wildlife management, illegal hunting and conflicts. A bioeconomic analysis," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 1(02), pages 165-181, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:endeec:v:1:y:1996:i:02:p:165-181_00
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Winkler, Ralph, 2011. "Why do ICDPs fail?: The relationship between agriculture, hunting and ecotourism in wildlife conservation," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 55-78, January.
    2. Samson Mukanjari, Edwin Muchapondwa, Precious Zikhali and Birgit Bednar-Friedl, 2012. "Evaluating the Prospects of Benefit Sharing Schemes in Protecting Mountain Gorillas in Central Africa," Working Papers 321, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    3. Bandara, Ranjith & Tisdell, Clement A., 2002. "Rural and Urban Attitudes to the Conservation of Asian Elephants in Sri Lanka: Empirical Evidence," Economics, Ecology and Environment Working Papers 48736, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
    4. Sanchirico, James N. & Wilen, James E., 2005. "Optimal spatial management of renewable resources: matching policy scope to ecosystem scale," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 23-46, July.
    5. Muller, Jeffrey & Albers, Heidi J., 2004. "Enforcement, payments, and development projects near protected areas: how the market setting determines what works where," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 185-204, June.
    6. Birgit Bednar-Friedl & Doris Behrens & Michael Getzner, 2012. "Optimal Dynamic Control of Visitors and Endangered Species in a National Park," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 52(1), pages 1-22, May.
    7. Stefanie Engel & Charles Palmer & Alexander Pfaff, 2013. "On the Endogeneity of Resource Co-management: Theory and Evidence from Indonesia," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 89(2), pages 308-329.
    8. Heidi Gjertsen & HChristopher B. Barrett, 2004. "Context-Dependent Biodiversity Conservation Management Regimes: Theory and Simulation," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 80(3), pages 321-339.
    9. Gardner Brown, 2000. "Renewable Natural Resource Management and Use Without Markets," Working Papers 0025, University of Washington, Department of Economics.
    10. repec:eee:jpolmo:v:39:y:2017:i:2:p:185-205 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Gardner M. Brown, 2000. "Renewable Natural Resource Management and Use without Markets," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 38(4), pages 875-914, December.
    12. Anders H. Sirén & Juan-Camilo Cardenas & Peter Hambäck & Kalle Parvinen, 2013. "Distance Friction and the Cost of Hunting in Tropical Forest," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 89(3), pages 558-574.
    13. Richard Damania & Pasquale Lucio Scandizzo & Ann Jeannette Glauber, 2014. "Ecosystems - Burden or Bounty?," CEIS Research Paper 324, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 08 Aug 2014.
    14. Fischer, Carolyn & Sterner, Thomas & Muchapondwa, Edwin, 2005. "Bioeconomic Model of Community Incentives for Wildlife Management Before and After CAMPFIRE," Discussion Papers dp-05-06, Resources For the Future.
    15. Robinson, Elizabeth J.Z. & Albers, Heidi J. & Busby, Gwenlyn M., 2013. "The impact of buffer zone size and management on illegal extraction, park protection, and enforcement," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 96-103.
    16. Sanchirico, James & Wilen, James, 2000. "Dynamics of Spatial Exploitation: A Metapopulation Approach," Discussion Papers dp-00-25-rev, Resources For the Future.
    17. Sanchirico, James & Wilen, James, 1998. "Marine Reserves: Is There a Free Lunch?," Discussion Papers dp-99-09, Resources For the Future.
    18. Smith, Martin D. & Sanchirico, James N. & Wilen, James E., 2009. "The economics of spatial-dynamic processes: Applications to renewable resources," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 57(1), pages 104-121, January.
    19. Doris Behrens & Birgit Bednar-Friedl & Michael Getzner, 2009. "Sustainable management of an alpine national park: handling the two-edged effect of tourism," Central European Journal of Operations Research, Springer;Slovak Society for Operations Research;Hungarian Operational Research Society;Czech Society for Operations Research;Österr. Gesellschaft für Operations Research (ÖGOR);Slovenian Society Informatika - Section for Operational Research;Croatian Operational Research Society, vol. 17(3), pages 233-253, September.
    20. Skonhoft, Anders, 1998. "Resource utilization, property rights and welfare--Wildlife and the local people," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 67-80, July.
    21. Bulte, Erwin H. & Horan, Richard D., 2003. "Habitat conservation, wildlife extraction and agricultural expansion," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 109-127, January.
    22. Albers, H.J., 2010. "Spatial modeling of extraction and enforcement in developing country protected areas," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 165-179, April.
    23. repec:eee:ecolec:v:143:y:2018:i:c:p:218-226 is not listed on IDEAS
    24. Sanchirico, James N. & Wilen, James E., 1999. "Bioeconomics of Spatial Exploitation in a Patchy Environment," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 129-150, March.

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