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Measuring the Non-Linear Effects of Monetary Policy

Author

Listed:
  • Christian Matthes

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond)

  • Regis Barnichon

    (CREI)

Abstract

This paper proposes a method to identify the non-linear effects of structural shocks by using Gaussian basis functions to parametrize impulse response functions. We apply our approach to monetary policy and find that the effect of a monetary intervention depends strongly on (i) the sign of the intervention, (ii) the size of the intervention, and (iii) the state of the business cycle at the time of the intervention. A contractionary policy has a strong adverse effect on output, much stronger than linear estimates suggest, but an expansionary policy has, on average, no significant effect on output. An expansionary policy can have some expansionary effect on output, but only if the intervention is large and during a recession. Even so, a contractionary policy is always more potent than its expansionary counterpart.

Suggested Citation

  • Christian Matthes & Regis Barnichon, 2015. "Measuring the Non-Linear Effects of Monetary Policy," 2015 Meeting Papers 49, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed015:49
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Morten Ravn & Martin Sola, 1996. "A Reconsideration of the Empirical Evidence on the Asymmetric Effects of Money-supply shocks: Positive vs. Negative or Big vs. Small," Archive Discussion Papers 9606, Birkbeck, Department of Economics, Mathematics & Statistics.
    6. Santoro, Emiliano & Petrella, Ivan & Pfajfar, Damjan & Gaffeo, Edoardo, 2014. "Loss aversion and the asymmetric transmission of monetary policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 19-36.
    7. Carl E. Walsh, 2010. "Monetary Theory and Policy, Third Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 3, volume 1, number 0262013770, September.
    8. Alan J. Auerbach & Yuriy Gorodnichenko, 2012. "Fiscal Multipliers in Recession and Expansion," NBER Chapters, in: Fiscal Policy after the Financial Crisis, pages 63-98, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    11. Racine, Jeffrey S., 2008. "Nonparametric Econometrics: A Primer," Foundations and Trends(R) in Econometrics, now publishers, vol. 3(1), pages 1-88, March.
    12. Valerie A. Ramey & Sarah Zubairy, 2018. "Government Spending Multipliers in Good Times and in Bad: Evidence from US Historical Data," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 126(2), pages 850-901.
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    Cited by:

    1. Furceri, Davide & Loungani, Prakash & Zdzienicka, Aleksandra, 2018. "The effects of monetary policy shocks on inequality," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 168-186.
    2. Jackson, Laura E. & Owyang, Michael T. & Soques, Daniel, 2018. "Nonlinearities, smoothing and countercyclical monetary policy," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 136-154.
    3. Dalibor Stevanovic, 2015. "Factor augmented autoregressive distributed lag models with macroeconomic applications," CIRANO Working Papers 2015s-33, CIRANO.
    4. de Ridder, M. & Pfajfar, D., 2017. "Policy Shocks and Wage Rigidities: Empirical Evidence from Regional Effects of National Shocks," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1717, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    5. Hussain, Syed M. & Malik, Samreen, 2016. "Asymmetric Effects of Exogenous Tax Changes," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 268-300.
    6. Francisco RUGE-MURCIA, 2014. "Indirect Inference Estimation of Nonlinear Dynamic General Equilibrium Models : With an Application to Asset Pricing under Skewness Risk," Cahiers de recherche 15-2014, Centre interuniversitaire de recherche en économie quantitative, CIREQ.
    7. Barnichon, Régis & Matthes, Christian, 2015. "Stimulus versus Austerity: The Asymmetric Government Spending Multiplier," CEPR Discussion Papers 10584, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

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