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The Mode of Competition between Foreign and Domestic Goods, Pass-Through, and External Adjustment

Author

Listed:
  • Raphael Schoenle

    (Brandeis University)

  • Raphael Auer

    (Swiss National Bank)

Abstract

We introduce Armington's (1969) notion of "origin differentiation" into a micro-founded model of pricing to market and examine how this affects the joint dynamics of prices and quantities in an international real business cycle framework. We find that the model, when calibrated using parameters that we structurally estimate from micro data on U.S. domestic and import prices, can match both movements in international relative prices and quantities as observed in the data. The mechanism that drives our results is that a moderate degree of substitutability between origins, combined with a high degree of substitutability between varieties from the same origin implies substantial variability in the markups of importers and limited spillovers into domestic prices, while at the same time it is consistent with a muted quantity response to such pronounced movements in relative prices.

Suggested Citation

  • Raphael Schoenle & Raphael Auer, 2014. "The Mode of Competition between Foreign and Domestic Goods, Pass-Through, and External Adjustment," 2014 Meeting Papers 1059, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed014:1059
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    File URL: https://economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2014/paper_1059.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Emi Nakamura & Dawit Zerom, 2010. "Accounting for Incomplete Pass-Through," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 77(3), pages 1192-1230.
    2. Auer, Raphael A. & Schoenle, Raphael S., 2016. "Market structure and exchange rate pass-through," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 60-77.
    3. Nakamura, Emi & Zerom, Dawit, 2008. "Accounting for Incomplete Pass-Through," MPRA Paper 14389, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Arpita Chatterjee & Rafael Dix-Carneiro & Jade Vichyanond, 2013. "Multi-product Firms and Exchange Rate Fluctuations," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 5(2), pages 77-110, May.
    5. Chen, Natalie & Imbs, Jean & Scott, Andrew, 2009. "The dynamics of trade and competition," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 50-62, February.
    6. Philippe Bacchetta & Eric van Wincoop, 2003. "Why Do Consumer Prices React Less Than Import Prices to Exchange Rates?," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(2-3), pages 662-670, 04/05.
    7. Burstein, Ariel T. & Neves, Joao C. & Rebelo, Sergio, 2003. "Distribution costs and real exchange rate dynamics during exchange-rate-based stabilizations," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(6), pages 1189-1214, September.
    8. repec:hrv:faseco:32116841 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Hellerstein, Rebecca, 2008. "Who bears the cost of a change in the exchange rate? Pass-through accounting for the case of beer," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(1), pages 14-32, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Auer, Raphael A. & Schoenle, Raphael S., 2016. "Market structure and exchange rate pass-through," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 60-77.
    2. Demian, Calin-Vlad & di Mauro, Filippo, 2018. "The exchange rate, asymmetric shocks and asymmetric distributions," International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 154(C), pages 68-85.

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